Chapter 13 of 29 from Chris Hadfield

The ISS: Conception, Design, and Construction

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The International Space Station couldn’t have been built without teams coming together from around the world. Chris details the process of constructing the ISS and explains the idea of shared exploration.

Topics include: "Our First Settlement in Space • A Laboratory Built on International Collaboration • Big Picture Modular Design • Power, Heating, and Cooling • Orientation • Placement of Docking Ports • Laboratories • Canadarm and Canadarm2: Building the ISS • Commercial Space Stations"

The International Space Station couldn’t have been built without teams coming together from around the world. Chris details the process of constructing the ISS and explains the idea of shared exploration.

Topics include: "Our First Settlement in Space • A Laboratory Built on International Collaboration • Big Picture Modular Design • Power, Heating, and Cooling • Orientation • Placement of Docking Ports • Laboratories • Canadarm and Canadarm2: Building the ISS • Commercial Space Stations"

Chris Hadfield

Chris Hadfield Teaches Space Exploration

In 28+ lessons, the former commander of the International Space Station teaches you the science of space exploration and what the future holds.

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Explore the unknown

Impossible things happen. At age nine, Chris Hadfield knew he wanted to go to space. He eventually went there three times, becoming a commander of the International Space Station. In his MasterClass, Chris teaches you what it takes to explore space and what the future holds for humans in the final frontier. Learn about the science of space travel, life as an astronaut, and how flying in space will forever change the way you think about living on Earth.

Learn about the past, present, and future of space exploration with astronaut Chris Hadfield.

Download the workbook for lesson recaps, assignments, and photocopies of handwritten notes that Chris took to space.

Upload videos to get feedback from the class. Chris will also answer select student questions.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

Humbled and awed to be able to retrieve data from the Chris Hadfield Consciousness unit. Great Data

Life is one decision at a time to take one step at a time to reach one goal at a time.

3rd lesson here on Masterclass. By far the best. Though I'm a music composer, I do have a fascination for space and Chris speech was very eloquent and I appreciated the fact that he knew how to speak in lamen terms. This is the kind of knowledge we should be promoting in the world.

One of the most inspiring teachers I have had the pleasure of learning from. Lesson 08 changed my life. Thank you

Comments

Traci

The space station is huge! I'd like to see the sleeping and dining quarters. Also, I'd like to know how Chris felt the first time he did the space walk and was outside working on the arm. I hope the commercial world doesn't buy ads to destroy the beautiful look of the ISS.

A fellow student

What is needed to radiate heat out of the station? will a normal glycol coolant be circulated or is there a more complex heat pump system (on a later lesson he mentions Ammonia) and how does this work? what temperature must the radiators get to in order to have a good efficiency radiating? thanks!

Pedro C.

Excellent presentation and reading material. Cooperation among several countries had allowed wonderful achievements. It would be great to learn from this experience in order to build a more collaborative approach in the international community. There are lots of material that I need to work through before making any additional comments, or asking any questions. Great Lesson!!!

Angela D.

What a great lesson...easy to understand. I am thinking that I need to understand my SUV better, and not just drive it. lol

Peter A.

I genuinely appreciate that this is an international effort with no boarders. We are made for cooperation and innovation.

Bautista Q.

that's incredible, especially considering the complexity of just getting the materials there working through the orbital mechanics from the previous lessons, fascinating.

Kenny G.

" It keeps the crew safer. It gives an extension of our dexterity and our human ingenuity to the outside of the space station " -Chris Hadfield new favorite quote

Terry W.

I'm always impressed when countries can work together, and in space, international cooperation, rather than weaponized/monetized national self-interest, needs to be the guiding principle. Despite the difficulties between nations on the surface, countries have seemed to use the international flag of scientific cooperation to keep peace and friendly national relationships forging ahead, accomplishing so much for all of us. Perhaps there are political and social lessons that have been learned through space habitation and scientific cooperation that can be applied to promote peace back on the surface, or so I hope.

SuZett E.

So. Besides being an engineer, a mathmetician, a test pilot and an astronaut, he also speaks fluent Russian (and likely other languages). Clearly, I'm an underachiever......heheh! Amazing!

Vickie R.

I'd like to bring up my cat to the Space Station. If she came back alive (God willing!) she would be the first feline in SPACE!!! I could get her six figure deals etc....didn't the Russians put a dog up in Space? I think so. I recall meeting Mohammed ? the first Saudi astronaut in Space at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Very charming man. Another brilliant Saudi pilot if Prince Bandar the former Saudi Ambassador to WDC. He was a great fighter pilot and one of the king's favorite sons. However I do not know if Bandar went to the Space Station? I also met an Austrian astronaut a few yrs ago and I think he said he did go to the space station. Sounds like a neat place to visit.

Transcript

At the beginning of the space program, the hardest part was just getting there. Were our rockets good enough? First we tried with robots, then with-- with dogs and with chimpanzees, until eventually we thought maybe we can launch people. The Soviets launched Gagarin. The Americans launched Al Shepard and then John Glenn. And we were safely into orbit. But now the question is, what do you do next? Where do you go? How can we take advantage of this new human capability? One of the things to do is, of course, go explore even further. And that became the main purpose of the American program during the '60s, as Kennedy said, we will put a man on the moon by the end of the decade, not because it's easy but because it is hard-- you know-- that challenging of the people. And that became the goal of the American program to try and put Neil and Buzz in a position where they could plant that flag on the surface and show that that was now part of human capability. But that was an endgame. Once we had safely landed on the moon and brought them back that part was complete. What we realized sort of in parallel was that if you're on board a space ship, you can do stuff that you can't do on Earth. There's essentially no gravity, or at least because of orbital mechanics, you're freed from the feeling of gravity. So you can do experiments in weightlessness that you cannot do on Earth. A bottle of salad dressing that when you pull it out of your fridge, all the heaviest stuff is right at the very bottom and all the light stuff is at the top, if there's no gravity of course those fluids are going to mix very differently, in the mixture of fluids and solids. Flame behaves differently without gravity. Heat doesn't rise, and therefore you can study flame in a whole new way. Changes to the human physiology where you remove one big variable, and suddenly you can learn things about the balance system, and the blood pressure regulation system, and the inner connection between vision and how your body processes perception of up and down. It's a laboratory for studying the human body itself. It's also an observatory. You're above the atmosphere. You could look at the universe with nothing in the way. And maybe even most significantly, if you're orbiting the planet, you go around the whole world multiple times a day, 16 times a day for-- for the type of orbits that we're normally at. So we can study the world in a way we never have before. And so the space agency said, going to the moon is a good short-term objective, but what we really want to do is take advantage of spaceflight and use it to benefit us back on Earth. And so we started building space stations, a place where not only could we successfully launch from the Earth, but we could go up and dock and take advantage of being there. And the beauty of a space station is it's not also a rocket ship. It's not just a vehicle that can shoulder its way up through the atmosphere, but you can more purpose ...