Chapter 6 of 26 from Ken Burns

Treatments, Pitching, and Funding

Play

Filmmaking requires passion, vision—and money. Using an example from The Civil War, Ken teaches you the purpose and process of writing a treatment and his tips for navigating the world of fundraising.

Topics include: Treatments: Formalize and Communicate Your Passion • Before Writing a Treatment, Gather the Whole Orchard • Fundraising: Avenues, Options, and Creative Control • Pursue and Prep for the Pitch • Pitch to Sources Who Care About Your Subject • Budget Enough for Yourself • Push Through

Filmmaking requires passion, vision—and money. Using an example from The Civil War, Ken teaches you the purpose and process of writing a treatment and his tips for navigating the world of fundraising.

Topics include: Treatments: Formalize and Communicate Your Passion • Before Writing a Treatment, Gather the Whole Orchard • Fundraising: Avenues, Options, and Creative Control • Pursue and Prep for the Pitch • Pitch to Sources Who Care About Your Subject • Budget Enough for Yourself • Push Through

Ken Burns

Ken Burns Teaches Documentary Filmmaking

The 15-time Emmy Award winner teaches how he navigates research and uses audio and visual storytelling methods to bring history to life.

Learn More

Share

The drama of truth

Since its 2017 debut, Ken Burns’s The Vietnam War has enthralled over 39 million viewers by painting an intimate and revealing portrait of history. Learn how Ken captivates audiences with his ability to distill vast research and complex truths into compelling narratives. From first treatment to final edit, Ken teaches his documentary filmmaking techniques that “wake the dead” to bring their stories to life.

Ken teaches his unique creative process through case studies of his films, original treatments, voice over scripts, archival documents, and more.

A downloadable workbook accompanies the class with lesson recaps, assignments, and supplemental materials.

Upload videos to get feedback from the class. Ken will also critique select student work.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

Great class - but I really dislike the nagging BEFORE YOU GO ON screens begging for reviews. Really ANNOYS me. Masterclass is a premium paid product and the marketing dept steps in breaking my enjoyment. I am paying to not get nagged. HATE THE NAGGING!!!!

I've been trying to conceptualize and develop the seed of a project idea. This course has helped my visualize the next steps and a finished product.

I knew nothing of Ken Burns going in to this MasterClass. It was enlightening and refreshing to learn about his process and approach to his craft. There were tons of golden nuggets that can be applied to my world of sports!

I got a fantastic appreciation for the art and process for making a documentary film in the style of Ken Burns, whose work I've greatly admired. I especially appreciated his approach to this project and the inspiration he offered throughout. This course was extremely well done. I'm impressed!

Comments

Mary C.

Ken, have you had ideas stolen? Routinely, networks and production companies will accept film pitches but their responses via letter or email states that "we may have similar ideas in consideration". Through the pitch, you've abandoned all rights to the idea. You can submit pitches with "copyrights" and post a copy to yourself but they can always claim to have had the idea first. They may alter the idea sufficiently to cover themselves but it happens all the time. It has happened to us as wildlife and conservation doco filmmakers. That, and being a principal on a film, purposefully being left off credits are big bummers. The other thing that has happened is that an unethical executive producer will open up their file cabinets and give your story or aspects of your film, away as a favor to a colleague. Has anyone else had this happen?

Mia S.

"So interesting - we always in some ways come back to an essential part, of many essential parts, of a treatment in what we finally do, not out of some loyalty to it, but out of the fact that in order to communicate a passion and an enthusiasm for a particular subject, we had to understand how that subject needed to be told, and that means you get a double bang for it. You just say, 'Well I'm out there, I'm raising money, it's helping me understand what it is.' Before you write a treatment, before you commit anything to the page, you've got to know something. You can't just fake it. So it's reading a lot of books, talking to a lot of people, mostly scholars I think. It's also talking with the people you're going to make it with about what you can do and what you can't do. What are the things that you want to try to see in it? You're always really surprised that new scholarship is going in a different direction than you thought you would go. And you have to make room for it. You have to sort of move aside and say, 'Oh, we have to figure out a way.' So if you draw some conclusions, you've limited yourself, but if you say, 'I think it's got these parameters, I'd like to try to do as much as we can.' When we said 'baseball,' we'd assumed we'd be able to do everything. Film-making is like going up into my orchard when it's in full fruiting, and you just want to take every apple, but you can only fit whatever you can fit in your apron. You have to be out there engaging all the different points of view and presuming that you're going to be able to bring back the whole flippin' orchard, even though you can't."

Mia S.

"I think a treatment is - at least for me - essentially a fundraising tool that turns out in the discipline in order to write it; something that helps us sort of plant the flag creatively in what we're going to do; it's going to develop into an expanded treatment, or the scripts or the blueprint for how we're going to go out and start shooting and actually making the thing. I learned as much about writing working on proposals and treatments as I've done writing in the films themselves - and while I really want to focus on the latter because that's the important and the glamorous stuff, in fact, the other stuff has been equally important and we've learned stuff again about what we wanted to do by refining it. You have ot be able to sort of tell - distill the essence of what you're going to do into a page, or page and a half or two pages, that is compelling to somebody who doesn't necessarily have the enthusiasm for the project that you do. Sometimes it's a really long essay, but it also has at the head a kind of abstract that says, 'This is what we think it's going to be. We work really hard on what that is.' I wrote one with my brother for the Civil War series. (Here's the proposal; big. I can read this and we'll be done in a couple of days.) Some of the granting sources, for me, required 25 pages, and some end up requiring (or we end up having) proposals that run more than 200 pages. This had a kind of opening abstract: 'Somehow, between 1861 and 1865,Americans made war on each other and killed each other in great numbers - if only to become the kind of nation that could no longer quite conceive how that was possible.' My brother wrote that sentence - it's so flipping good that it's in the film; we added it to Jeff Ward's script because it's so good. 'The Civil War made us what we are - a union. But to become united, we had to tear each other apart, and in so doing, we went far towards eliminating the differences that had made the war inevitable. And at the center of it all is the simple fact no less terrible for being obvious: The Civil War was, above all, about men dying. And no talk of the glory of battle or what might otherwise have been can reduce the foolishness, the absurdity, the tragedy of that. We wish in our film to convey that tragedy - to particularize it in the words and deeds and lives of the men and women who experienced it.'"

Charles B.

I went to school in the 1990s to learn Journalism and received my Associate's Degree. My Professor at the time had sat on the 17 member commission that created the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. I then spent a few years working on the production crew for the PBS affiliate. It was frustrating because I kept feeling like the step by step process simply wasn't there, and at the time I didn't know how to articulate that, and as a result I kept asking my Professor a lot of questions. Here, in about 2-3 hours time I've learned more about the step by step process than my prior educational school systems ever taught me. I have learned about the Society for Professional Journalism and the answers to some questions I've had since earning my Associate's Degree.

Scott S.

You know when a person really knows their craft..they can speak on it fluently and without a dozen umums, likes and ya knows. Ken just handed over a lifetime of experience, once again, in this brilliant lesson. This is what makes Masterclass one of the greatest examples of what the internet SHOULD BE about!

Mark M.

I am lazy [sitting in a recliner, Laptop on lap, watching this] I do animation as a hobby now that I am retired and having to do so much work just to get funding to make a documentary just seems too hard for an old man like me. I will just have to fund my own work - Great Lesson from Ken and Great Download- He is a Master and is willing to share with us

Signe K.

The biggest lesson I took from this class is "MAKE them curious and MAKE them no longer want to be ignorant." I am working on a personal documentary about my mother and her growing up in the late 70s-80s and from watching this film I now realize that I want to incorporate the history of the crack era and the effects of poverty... This is a topic that many know about but I am not sure that there is a film about a regular person and the real struggles that came out of this era.

Eric D.

Wonderful insights into treatment and fundraising. A lot of resources and materials I read make it sound so easy to apply and receive grants. But, it's challenging and competitive. But, I really appreciate Ken's perspective. One question perhaps someone can help me with: using Ken's Brooklyn Bridge documentary as an example — did he form a nonprofit to receive the grants he mentioned; did he use a fiscal sponsor; or grants to individual artists. How do individual artists receive grants?

Sunny N.

From this lesson, I now understand, among other things: Funding is not about entitlement. Funding requests can be supported by past accomplishment. Funding requires research skills. Funding requires strong writing skills. Funding is a necessary part of filmmaking.

mark L.

The links in the download are phenomenal and so is the inclusion of the treatment. Thank you!

Transcript

I think a treatment is, at least for me, it's essentially a fundraising tool that turns out in the discipline in order to write it, something that helps us sort of plant the flag creatively in what we're going to do. It's going to develop into an expanded treatment or the scripts or the blueprint for how we're going to go out and start shooting and actually making the thing. I learned as much about writing working on proposals and treatments as I've done writing in the films themselves. And while I really want to focus on the latter because that's the important and the glamorous stuff, in fact, the other stuff has been equally important. And we've learned stuff again about what we wanted to do by refining it. You have to be able to sort of tell it to distill the essence of what you're going to do into a page or a page and a half or two pages that is compelling to somebody who doesn't necessarily have the enthusiasm for the project that you do. Sometimes it's a really long essay. But it also has at the head a kind of abstract that says, this is what we think it's going to be. And we work really hard on what that is. And I wrote one with my brother Rick for the Civil War series, which, you know, maybe it would be good to read. You know? So here's the proposal. Big. Well, I can read this and we'll be done in a couple of days. Some of the granting sources for me required 25 pages. And some end up requiring-- or we end up having-- proposals that run more than 200 pages. This had a kind of opening abstract. "Somehow between 1861 and 1865, Americans made war on each other and killed each other in great numbers-- if only to become the kind of nation that could no longer quite conceive how that was possible." My brother wrote that sentence. It's so flippin' good that it's in the film. We added it to Jeff Ward's script because it's so good. "The Civil War made us what we are, a union. But to become united, we had to tear each other apart. And in so doing, we went far towards eliminating the differences that had made the war inevitable. And at the center of it all is the simple fact no less terrible for being obvious the Civil War was above all about men dying. And no talk of the glory of battle or what might otherwise have been can reduce the foolishness, the absurdity, the tragedy of that. We wish in our film to convey that tragedy, to particularize it in the words and deeds and lives of the men and women who experienced it." So interesting, we always in some ways come back to an essential part, or many essential parts, of a treatment in what we finally do, not out of some loyalty to it, but out of the fact that in order to communicate a passion and an enthusiasm for a particular subject, we had to understand how that subject needed to be told. And that means you get a double bang for it. You just say, well, I'm out there. I'm raising money. But it's helping me understand what it is. [MUSIC PLAYING] Before you write a treatment...