Chapter 18 of 21 from Reba McEntire

Values as a Musician

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It’s not just what you do—but how you do it. Learn the core values of how Reba conducts her life and business, and how she has managed a graceful 40-year career.

Topics include: Being Likeable • Avoiding Gossip • How to Treat Success

Reba McEntire

Reba McEntire Teaches Country Music

Reba teaches her approach to making great country music and navigating the business in 21 video lessons.

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I tell Shelby all the time, I'll always love you. But I want everybody else to like you. So if you're likeable and you're an easy person to work with, people will want to be around you and work with you more. And mean it sincerely. Walk in with a good attitude, smile on your face, not a chip on your shoulder. Presence and attitude goes a long way. I'd much rather work with a person with a great attitude and less talent than the opposite. And another thing that's very important, climbing up the ladder you're going to go down that ladder sometime. And all those people that are going up with you and that you're a smart Alec to or rude, they may be running the company one day. And then you're going to have to answer to them. So just treat people like you want to be treated. And be nice to everybody. And then you don't have to worry about, well, was I nice to him? Or was I nice to her? Be honest and truthful and nice to everybody. And then you've got all the bases covered. [MUSIC PLAYING] One piece of advice I'd really want to give to you about gossip, be careful what you say about other people. And I'd say that's my worst fault is gossiping. If you can just remember-- and I try this real hard, and I'm failing at it miserably but I try so hard-- is, when you're starting to talk about a person don't say anything about them that you wouldn't say if they were sitting right here because if you're talking about somebody to somebody who's listening, they just can't wait to say what you said to somebody else. And it's probably the person you were talking about. So my best advice to you starting out in this business, watch what you say and who you say it to. [MUSIC PLAYING] When people have integrity, they have longevity. They have a history of being dependable, reliable, successful. And they're usually people that you like to be around. I know a lot of people like that. I opened shows for them. I have toured with them. And that's the folks you like to be around. Integrity is very important. People see you on and offstage. They see you in the recording studio. And you carry an integrity with you-- how you conduct yourself, how you talk to people, how you conduct yourself at a restaurant. Are you polite to the waitstaff? Do you look them in the eye when you order or when you ask for another glass of iced tea, which I absolutely love? Being honest, showing up on time, being prepared, and when you tell somebody you're going to do it you do it-- people remember that. And a guy sitting over there on the sideline watching you perform, who knows? He might be the head of a company that's going to book you on the best private show you've ever gotten to work with or put you on the show with a huge headliner. Say what you mean, and do what you say when you make a commitment. All those things go with you for the rest of y...

For Love of Country

You know her songs. Her Oklahoma charm. Now learn directly from Reba in her first-ever online class. Join her as she records a never-before-heard song, creates a new acoustic version of Fancy, breaks down her hits, and delivers emotional performances on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry. This is more than a music class. This is Reba's life, business, and country music MasterClass.

Watch, listen, and learn as Reba covers everything from choosing the right song to navigating the music business.

A downloadable workbook accompanies the class with lesson recaps and supplemental materials.

Upload videos to get feedback from the class. Reba will also critique select student work.

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Reba McEntire

Reba McEntire Teaches Country Music