Chapter 15 of 25 from Steve Martin

A Life In the Arts

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Failure, rivalry, bad reviews: being a comedian is hard. Steve teaches you how to roll with the punches and advocates for a life of being in the arts.

Topics include: Love Your Rivals • Embrace the Struggle • Negative Feedback Is a Badge of Honor • Don’t Overanalyze Comedy • Leave Artistry Behind When You're on Stage

Failure, rivalry, bad reviews: being a comedian is hard. Steve teaches you how to roll with the punches and advocates for a life of being in the arts.

Topics include: Love Your Rivals • Embrace the Struggle • Negative Feedback Is a Badge of Honor • Don’t Overanalyze Comedy • Leave Artistry Behind When You're on Stage

Steve Martin

Steve Martin Teaches Comedy

In 25 video lessons, Steve Martin teaches you everything from finding your comedic voice to nailing your act.

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A comedian walks into a classroom...

One of Steve’s first gigs was at the drive-in movies. When the audience liked a joke, they honked. In this class, Steve shares insights from performing for cars and humans over a 50-year career spanning sold-out arenas and blockbuster films. Learn how to find your voice, gather material, develop an act, and take your comedy to the next level.

Watch, listen, and learn as Steve Martin shares wisdom from his five decades in comedy.

A downloadable workbook accompanies the class with lesson recaps and supplemental materials.

Upload videos to get feedback from the class. Steve will also critique select student work.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

His words are so important for today. We all need to laugh together not at each other!

Steve Martin has taught me so much about comedy, performing and even writing jokes - he's inspired me greatly and helped get back my confidence! I've filled so many pages with important notes from these classes :D Thank you Steve Martin!

At the very least, this Masterclass and others have made me feel like I actually can do what I dream of doing.

This man is not just funny, he is genius understanding and teaching the art and science communication. Loved this session so much!

Comments

Margaret M.

Godel Escher Bach! Steve must have one of THE most amazing lives in the arts, ever.

KONRAD R.

They say the difference between heaven and hell is as follows: In hell there are these little people going around with spoons fighting and trying to feed themselves. In heaven there are the same little people but they are taking turns feeding each other. I saw Mr.Martin demonstrate this at a reading: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6HDZiEnGBk Douglas Richard Hofstadter, thought mutations, love this idea!

SunShine M.

I can find absolutely none of these documentaries on Netflix, any suggestions? I did see the one about Joan Rivers and Lenny Bruce. My takeaway is this; I wanna be just like Joan Rivers when I grow up! Not much has changed since her time as far as men don't like funny women butt some women, we just plow through and do it anyway. I LOVED IT when Johnny Carson asked her, "you really think men don't like smart women?" And Joan Rivers said, "what man has ever reached up a woman's skirt looking for a library card?" She paved the way so much. I feel as comedians we owe so much to Lenny Bruce. I'm also very concerned about our current state of affairs with the PC Obsession. I feel like we went full circle and now we are where we started; not being able to say anything and it's terrifying. I have amazing bits that are super funny and I've canned them because I'm scared, we are not allowed to talk about anything anymore. You'll get called racist or whatever. Watching the Lenny Bruce documentary I was shocked to hear him say the "N" word on stage for his set. I'm not saying that's where I want our society to be, I don't have a desire to say it butt our society now scares me. We are not allowed to talk and when it comes to comedy that's pretty scary.

Daniel S.

An artist creates substance from absence, beauty from void. Art can be spoken, writing, drawn, painted, sculpted, built, created, anything really. Art can be talking something that already exists and changing it meaningfully. Making money as an artist is a discipline that few can master. This is as it should be. I create art as a tool for getting out of my head or playing with my imagination. I have been paid for some of my photography or digital art, I designed a card game to help my ESL students reinforce their English lessons, so I got paid a little. But I would never make a living doing it. I like hanging around creatives. It's usually the one time I find my self amoung people as f'd up as I am.

Michael G.

more of a general question, but I am currently an open micr one year in and Im going to be in nyc for a little over a month staying with a friend and doing mics at night but I am wondering whether I should take an improv class or a general acting class, and I am not sure which one would be best, please let me know your thoughts, thank you!

Jack P.

Completely agree with Steve's advice to be multidisciplinary. I work for a bank and most of the ideas I come across with are about managing risks, improving processes etc. Taking this course and going though the posts exposed me to a wider variety of views and ways to express them.

Bruce L.

I am enjoying this, however I have a basic question. When do you have a career in art - when do you know what you are doing is art? For example - when does an architect become an artist when he creates a building. Designing homes or Frank Loyd Wright. When does a speaker become an artist. Is there an underlying quality that changes the ordinary into art.

Janice O.

I have been thinking about this a lot. I think I would like a life in the arts. But I am getting ready to turn 50. And not that 50 isn't funny as heck, but I don't have as long to build that portfolio of funny things. How old is too old to break into show business? And what about the lifestyle? I not gonna be partying late. Nope, closest thing to me partying at night is going to bed without pajamas.

Henrik H.

GIVING AND RECEIVING CRITICISM The worst thing I know is when I have done an act that I KNOW did not land well, and friends (or other comedians) tell me "Oh, it was ok". It feels like they are trying to protect my feelings. How do you guys make other people comfortable to give you honest and constructive criticism?

Luculent L.

Now 3! That made me laugh, best juggling act ever. I used to be a pool player, and that was one thing I liked about being a player in a big city. There were always road players coming through town, and I got to know some of the best players so I knew who not to play. You learn very quickly there is always someone better. I was told by someone that wasn't one of the best players ever, but he told me about lemon pool. I asked 'What the heck is that', but basically it is you can be the best player in town, who no one will play, or you can be good and unknown. Don't play tournaments, don't let your ego get in the way and spot (handicap) weaker players and don't beat other really good players. I would travel to small town and make a lot of money because in a smaller town, someone that can be beat everyone in their town except for the best couple of people tend to be very overconfident about their ability. Comedy is very competitive, but I would much rather follow someone that left the audience laughing than someone who just bombed and the audience have their car keys in their hand and are closing out bar tabs. On the other hand, I can see why Tom Petty was upset having to follow Queen after Live Aid; a tough act to follow like no other.

Transcript

If you're watching this, you're at least fooling around with the idea of being in the arts. And I highly recommend a life of being in the arts and being with other artists. Because they're funny, have a happy life, they're creative, they think, they learn things. And it's a very exciting life. Whether it's your primary life choice or auxiliary, just opens your horizons. It's good to be in several disciplines because you gain friends in those worlds. If you have an interest in art, you don't have to be an artist, painter, but you can have those friends and they bring new things into your life. Musicians bring new things into your life. Comedians bring new things. Actors, directors. So it's good to be a polymath because you're going to meet so many different kinds of people who are going to affect your life positively and also affect your artistic life positively. You're going to have rivals. You're going to have people you're either jealous of. You're thinking, how did that person-- why do they love that person? Love your rivals. Your rivals make you better. They are going to inspire you to go further and also it's just wasting time because there's nothing you can do about it. No matter where you are, there's going to be somebody better. It's just part of being in show business or part of being in the arts. And you know, the best thing to do is to think of it as you're their compatriots. Get to know them. Find out what's going on. Hover around. You know, you can feed off each other. You can be good, confident, spirited rivals in a sense. But don't let it eat at you. If you're going to let it eat at you, use it. Use that kind of energy to say, what can I do? Don't get yourself down because someone is killing it out there, because it's always going to happen. It's not like you can say, I finally am better than everybody. Because then you just go like this, oh, I didn't see you there. It is hard to be a comedian. First of all, there is the travel, probably traveling alone. There is mostly rejection and failure and isolation, criticism. But looking back on it myself, I thought, I didn't know how hard it was. I only know now how hard it was. There was something about me personally that liked being isolated at that time in my life and liked being alone and was uncomfortable in groups and socially. I had some really close, good friends but I was always shy at a party, introverted. So there was something that suited me about this isolated travel. And like I say, I didn't know it was a struggle at the time. I looked back later I thought, that was a struggle. At the time I was enjoying it and I loved being on the road and I loved talking to people and picking up girls and having a cocktail and then going back to your depressing hotel room alone. I do an impression of what it's like, at least ...