Chapter 5 of 25 from Steve Martin

Developing a Comedic Persona

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It's not just what you say, it's how you say it. Steve explains how his own stage persona emerged and teaches you how to cultivate one that will take your material to the next level.

Topics include: Choose Who to Be • Imagine Yourself at Your Best • Explore Your Worst Quality • Dress the Part • Steve’s Comedic Persona

It's not just what you say, it's how you say it. Steve explains how his own stage persona emerged and teaches you how to cultivate one that will take your material to the next level.

Topics include: Choose Who to Be • Imagine Yourself at Your Best • Explore Your Worst Quality • Dress the Part • Steve’s Comedic Persona

Steve Martin

Steve Martin Teaches Comedy

In 25 video lessons, Steve Martin teaches you everything from finding your comedic voice to nailing your act.

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A comedian walks into a classroom...

One of Steve’s first gigs was at the drive-in movies. When the audience liked a joke, they honked. In this class, Steve shares insights from performing for cars and humans over a 50-year career spanning sold-out arenas and blockbuster films. Learn how to find your voice, gather material, develop an act, and take your comedy to the next level.

Watch, listen, and learn as Steve Martin shares wisdom from his five decades in comedy.

A downloadable workbook accompanies the class with lesson recaps and supplemental materials.

Upload videos to get feedback from the class. Steve will also critique select student work.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

Most of all, it has shown me, how Steve Martin looks at comedy. How he has built his jokes, and how with concistency he has become one of the best comedians in the world! Certainly i will be taking the class over and over again, because it has so much information, that i can use to become a better comedian.

Steve Martin is entertaining and instructional at the same time. It is a joy to learn from him.

Sailing into unknown waters with this venture. Steve's Intro clip made me fell welcome and wanted. Trim the sails and hold tight the wheel - - -

Yours was the first class I took. I wanted to see another perspective of creativity....and you had it....thank you Mr. Martin!!

Comments

A fellow student

Might I ask that you do something similar with Patton Oswalt and punching up scripts?

Jennifer F.

I am not looking to be famous, I just want to tell my story- it really is funny...and I don't want my friends to roll their eyes! Don't call me pretty- just call me funny! 😜

Mihaela C.

"I'm a really easy going gal, I make sure not to point out your mistakes. I also know how to appreciate someone's efforts, results don't mean anything to me. I'm just there for the ride"

Aniela M.

I think my worst quality is that I am uptight. I rebelled from my wild hippy parents by marrying my first boyfriend (20 years strong), crossing at all cross walks, and not smoking weed.

KONRAD R.

You know what they say, everyone wants to be a star. But also, quite a few people what to be real; they both seem like traps to me, what do you think? Is reality stranger than fiction or is it something else? There are a lot of faces out there , so it seems. I'm wondering if comics, like Robin Williams, are manic, in that they know too well most people aren't truly listening and or seem too sober to be sane in this seemingly insane world. I would like to know from Mr.Martin, how do you go up there in the spot light and stay sane and do it, again and again?

Billy F.

Simply terrific. Steve gets to the heart of what works and what is lacking.

Marilyn R.

When i asked my loved ones, whats my worst quality - my husband responds "respecting boundaries is your worst quality but thats because you love me so much" and i asked my best friends and she said "impulsiveness is your worst quality," and i said "but i married my husband on impulse and we see how that turned out.

tahiya M.

My worst quality is my impatience. That could be extremely funny. Especially since I'm not going to go up on stage until I'm 70. An amped up, hyper-impatient septuagenarian. Yep. That's funny. Who swears. A LOT! Now what will my 70-year-old self wear? She should wear things that 70-year-old ladies are never supposed to wear. Not like she thinks she's young, but like she really doesn't give a crap. What would be completely comfortable and totally ridiculous. A onesie with flip flops and a cape. Inappropriate sweatshirts with mean stuff like "I hate your kids" and "GET OUT!!" in rhinestones. Pegged pants like OyBoys in the 80's. Skinny tie. Tutu. Tutu and sweat pants. I should get a cane. Not for walking, for smacking stuff. Nah. Skip the cane. Billy club! this is fun.

Mary H.

Ironically, I'm being censored by facebook for trying to archive a photo of the archives. https://www.facebook.com/mary.hollowell.315/posts/779635302373503

Eli M.

My best quality? Probably my hospitable nature. I'm told I'm very warm and inviting. Worst quality? It would have to be the cannibalism.

Transcript

What are you doing onstage is creating an artistic image of yourself determined by the things you put in, the things you leave out, it's level of intellect, high or low, the use of language, everything is determining who you are as an artistic being on the stage. That's a very lofty way to think, you know, when you're just trying to get some material together. But ultimately, as it gets more sophisticated and starts to shape, you realize you're creating a human being. And that's what these great comedians did. If you look at Chris Rock, for example, he's created something. He created something from the sum total of his energy, and his routines, and his observations into a whole artistic state. And that of course, is the ultimate but-- And it's kind of beautiful. [MUSIC PLAYING] Once I was on an airplane, and I was in my 20s, something like that. And there was a very pretty girl on the airplane, and I was talking with her. And I said, what do you do. And she said, I'm an actress. And I said, oh. And we started talking. And she says I'm an actress. And she says it's very hard, you know, when I go into auditions to decide what to be. I don't know whether to be upbeat, or kind of low key, or more artistic. And I said, why don't you just be yourself? And she said, I'll try that. And I thought you have try to be yourself. But I've changed my opinion, because I often hear well just be yourself. But who knows what their self is? I don't. I mean maybe I have a little more now, but when you're starting out, you don't know what yourself is. You can be what you choose to be, and you can define a personality for yourself within reason, of course, and become that onstage. You already have a persona. Even if you're mildly interested in show business, you have some shape to your personality. But it is something that will emerge if you pay attention to yourself and pay attention to what's coming out naturally. [MUSIC PLAYING] Imagine yourself one night lying in bed, just imagine yourself at your best. Think, what would that be, if I were at my best? What is that image that comes into your head? And it's going to be very vague. But once you plant that image in your head, it's subconsciously something you're aiming for. Like, you say, what will I be at my best? Will I be totally in charge? Will I pace the stage? Will I be aggressive? Will I be witty, kind of more subtle? Will I be obvious? What do I want the audience's response to be? And I think it will lead you to creating your shape, and your form, and your personality-- As to have some kind of vague image of where you'd like to be ultimately. Now, the fact is your act is going to be created as you go along. Bits, they work. They don't work. Bing, you put them together. And it is really built in a practical framework, but it's also I think...