Chapter 24 of 25 from Steve Martin

Final Thoughts

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Steve concludes his class by offering some parting advice and words of inspiration.

Topics include: Steve's parting thoughts and conclusion to the class.

Steve Martin

Steve Martin Teaches Comedy

In 25 video lessons, Steve Martin teaches you everything from finding your comedic voice to nailing your act.

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I think when this class is done, depending on your personal interest-- let's say you're interested in comedy or performing stand-up comedy, and maybe you've made a couple of notes, and maybe you've been inspired, I'd say phone a friend. Someone with the same interest, and go over what you're talking about, what may be you picked up. I don't call it learning because the learning is going to take place on stage and in practice. But pitch those ideas around. I love the idea of collaborative schmoozing with people, with similar interests, and similar willingness to explore things at a little bit of a deeper level, because that inspires you. When you get a manifesto and you get a premise to work on and to apply to yourself, it's fun. Find the smallest place where you can go. Maybe it's a cub scout meeting, maybe it's something where there's a festival going on, find a little place to get up, talk to people. Always make it very small, at first. Very small, where the loss won't be taken so hard, because it is going to be tough. I always picture someone in a club at the lowest ebb of their career, kind of fighting against depression, and the response that isn't there, and the people talking, and the crash glasses, and I always have such a deep respect for comedians. I feel like I have an empathy with them. And I feel I could walk up, and go, I know, and they go, yeah. There's many people who have gone before, and gone are going through exactly what you did, so you have allies. You have allies while you're on stage, who have experienced the very thing you're doing, and have survived. I close the first chapter of my autobiography and just about this thought-- how difficult it is doing stand-up comedy because being alone onstage is the ego's last stand, and that's what you're taking on. No one is more vulnerable than a stand-up comedian standing alone. The one thing I'd like you to walk away with, as a student, is that it can be done. Whatever your level of talent is, it can be overcome, and overcoming a lack of talent often makes you unique, you're filling in. Instead of conventional singing, you're going to sing in a different way. Instead of conventional dancing, you're going to dance your own way. In fact, conventional is not so good, and that there will be room for you. The stage is always changing. It's always in flux. People come in, people go out, they're famous, or not famous, they move on, and you can be waiting in the wings there if you prepare yourself artistically, talent-wise, and be in the right place at the right time, which you can manipulate. I've really enjoyed doing this Masterclass with you. I hope you've gotten something out of it, whether it's something you can use, or something that will inspire you, and I hope that one day, if you have great success, you'll pass it along to someone else. Bye. OK, buddy here we go. [MUS...

A comedian walks into a classroom...

One of Steve’s first gigs was at the drive-in movies. When the audience liked a joke, they honked. In this class, Steve shares insights from performing for cars and humans over a 50-year career spanning sold-out arenas and blockbuster films. Learn how to find your voice, gather material, develop an act, and take your comedy to the next level.

Watch, listen, and learn as Steve Martin shares wisdom from his five decades in comedy.

A downloadable workbook accompanies the class with lesson recaps and supplemental materials.

Upload videos to get feedback from the class. Steve will also critique select student work.

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Steve Martin

Steve Martin Teaches Comedy