Culinary Arts

Sous Vide Cooking: Turbot

Thomas Keller

Lesson time 6:13 min

Continuing to use the immersion circulator at a constant temperature, Chef Keller cooks a piece of turbot with chicken velouté enriched with cream.

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Thomas Keller
Teaches Cooking Techniques III: Seafood, Sous Vide, and Desserts
Chef Thomas Keller’s third MasterClass is devoted to preparing seafood, sous vide cooking, and making classic desserts.
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- And we have our immersion circulator, which is maintaining a constant temperature as well as circulating the water. We know that water is the best conductor of heat. So as the water's circling, it's going through the pump, heating it to 57 degrees Celsius. We're cooking a piece of turbot, which is a beautiful, flat, white fish, traditionally caught in the northern sea, something that's a very highly prized fish. This fish can be almost any fish that you like. Turbot is what we've chosen today. It's been cooking for about six minutes. It's a relatively thin fillet. So we know that this size fillet at this temperature is going to cook in approximately six minutes. We've cooked it with a little bit of butter and a sprig of tarragon, as you can see. Now, the thickness of the fish really defines the length of time that it cooks. In other words, this filet could be this long and the same thickness, and it would still take the six minutes to cook. Once again, there's a lot of information about time and temperature as it relates to different pieces of proteins that are going to be available in our workbook. We're just going to quickly have our turbot. In the meantime, made a classic petits pois a la Francaise, which is springtime. So we have beautiful spring peas. We have our sauce supreme, which is a chicken veloute enriched with cream. That's the basis for the petits pois of our young peas. These peas have been big pot blanched in something we've done in our first MasterClass. Beautiful pearl onions cooked sous vide, some applewood smoked bacon cut into dice and blanched. And then a little chiffonade of lettuce, this is Romaine lettuce. You just put that in at the very end so it more or less wilts. Smells beautiful, check the seasoning. Adjust it. Add just a drop of butter. You see how that lettuce has just wilted there. In the meantime, I'm going to take my, again my, a little more sauce supreme, drain my turbo. Beautiful. I'm just going to glaze. For those of you who are wondering how we do this in a restaurant, this is exactly what we do. Go ahead and just put some of our garnish in our bowl. A very elegant, luxurious dish. Little pieces of chervil just to give it some finishing touches and elegance or a couple flakes of our finishing salt, and there we have it. Poached turbot, sous vide, 57 degrees, petits pois a la Francaise.


Elevate your cooking

In his third MasterClass, Chef Thomas Keller focuses on preparing fresh seafood like lobster and salmon, making classic desserts such as apple pie and lemon tart, and showing how sous vide cooking can be done at home to enhance flavor and texture. Whether you’re a beginning or advanced cook, you’ll learn the techniques and principles that will give you the understanding and skills to get the most delicious results.



Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

The Thomas Keller classes are excellent. I feel like there is a lot of value in what he teaches. Some of the other cuisine classes don't show you that much. His first class was the best, this class was the second best. It would be great if he did more.

Thomas Keller never disappoints me in how he demonstrates his recipes and instructions. I have taken all his Master Class series and he shows each step-in real-time details. Thank you so much!

Good God. This Masterclass has made me rethink how I touch everything in the kitchen.

I love Chef Keller. Every class I take from him makes me think I too could be a 3 Star Michelin Chef.


Comments

Steve B.

I loved this recipe and it delivered a delicious meal. However, there are no measurements for the amount of chicken stock vs Buerre Manie in the Sauce Veloute, nor for the cream and the cream Fraiche in the Sauce Supreme. I was able to go be “feel” to deliver the sauce consistency that I preferred, which may have been the point. But even so,it would be nice to have the measurements as a general benchmark. Also, note that if your double or triple the recipe to make either two or three servings, the amount of Sauce Supreme you will need is closer to the original receive. There is no need to triple or even double the recipe of the Sauce Supreme.

Margaret E.

I am really enjoying all the sous vide education. I was not sure I'd use it, but now I'm ready to start.