From Dan Brown's MasterClass

Research, Part 2

Dan goes deeper into his research process to show you how he uncovers the shocking connections between seemingly unrelated elements in his stories.

Topics include: Research Exhaustively to Find Connections • Don't Focus on Organization Too Early • If It Doesn't Serve Your Story, Don't Use It • Be Fair With Your Creative License • Don't Let Research Become Procrastination

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Dan goes deeper into his research process to show you how he uncovers the shocking connections between seemingly unrelated elements in his stories.

Topics include: Research Exhaustively to Find Connections • Don't Focus on Organization Too Early • If It Doesn't Serve Your Story, Don't Use It • Be Fair With Your Creative License • Don't Let Research Become Procrastination

Dan Brown

Teaches Writing Thrillers

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One of your jobs as a thriller writer is going to be making connections the reader doesn't see coming. That's part of the fun. When a reader says, oh, my god, that's why that happened, or that's related to that? You, of course, know all the answers when you're writing it. Your job is to hide it, and to reveal it in an exciting way. And you say, well, how do I find these connections? How do they magically appear? They don't magically appear. You do a lot of research. If you pick 100 pieces of information out at random, you have much greater possibility of finding two that are related than if you're lazy and pull out three pieces, and you say they're not related. You're right, they're not related, keep looking. This is-- it's a process of attrition. You-- if you pulled 200 facts out of the world, it is not difficult to make sure that a couple of them are connected. When I was researching "Origin," I knew that the world was science and religion. It was evolution. It was the interplay between science's version of where we came from and religion's view of where we came from. But I'd also set it in the world of modern art. I wanted Langdon to be a fish out of water, sort of exploring a world he hadn't explored before. And I thought, what artist could I use that tied into these themes of science and religion? Fortunately, William Blake is exactly that. His work is-- has a foot in both worlds. And I said, well, I have to use William Blake. He's perfect. I didn't know how I would use him. You don't need all the answers on day one. I just thought, William Blake's going to be perfect. He ties into the themes of this book. So without having all of the answers, I make a note to say, we're going to be looking at the art of William Blake. And that's really when you start the research process all over again. You dive into the works of William Blake, criticisms of his work, and you figure out, how can I use him? What little tidbit is-- am I gonna see? And it could be one line out of a 300-page book. And I don't want to pretend that I read a 300-page book on William Blake and know every word. I'm skimming. I'm looking for a diagram, just something to sort of go, wait a minute, I'm gonna find out about that. And that's what you can do, that you can sort of decide, I think this idea right here is going to work for me. And I don't know how. And then you research it. And through that research, you'll figure out, this is how it's gonna work. He wrote a poem about science and religion. Whoa, OK, hold on. "The dark religions are departed, and sweet science reigns?" Are you kidding me? That's perfect. The only way I found that is through research. And you put a big circle around it and you say, I'm gonna use that somehow. I still don't know how, but it's perfect. The harder you work at researching, the luckier you will get. The more work you do to gather information, the more fortunate you will be when you start looking for connections, when you...

Craft page-turning suspense

Packed with secret symbols and high-stakes suspense, Dan Brown’s thrillers have sold more than 250 million copies and include one of the world’s best-selling novels, The Da Vinci Code. In his writing class, Dan unveils his step-by-step process for turning ideas into gripping narratives. Learn his methods for researching like a pro, crafting characters, and sustaining suspense all the way to a dramatic surprise ending.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

Dan Brown lays out a step-by-step process for writing a thriller that really helped me think about how to make my current work-in-progress (i.e., a middle-grade adventure) more exciting, more on-the-edge-of-your-seat for readers. I've taken several other Masterclass courses on writing and, in my opinion, Dan Brown's was the best and most helpful.

Inspirational. Writing 101 in a good way. Highly recommend this course.

I have learned so much about having a better process, promises to your reader, timing. It was just a great class, thanks!

Dan is amazingly well-spoken and has finally laid to rest the lie that 'those can, do, and those who can't, teach'... his respect for teachers and the generosity with which he shared not only the craft, but also addressed the constant self-doubt facing creatives by sharing his own, in such a vulnerable fashion. Thank you, Dan, so much for this! Much respect, sir.

Comments

Michael S.

Jack Lemmon used to tell a story, I believe it was about director Billy Wilder who would compare scenes with pearls. And sometimes he could have this perfect scene, like the most beautiful pearl in the world. But if that gorgeous pearl didn't fit the necklace, you have to leave it out. He couldn't use that perfect scene if it didn't serve the film. I like how Dan Brown reminded me of that.

Will C.

Lovin' the lessons. Wondered if anyone has any thoughts on moving historical events around to lubricate the plot. I'm writing a story set in the oil and gas industry of about ten years ago; to help the plot it would be very useful to shift some (real) old events forward and (real) newer events back! (most of the events are pretty unknown - quite specialist stuff, not talking international news here). Workbook says: "be fair when taking liberties with the nonfiction elements of your book and try to keep those elements as true a possible. Readers may already know the setting you’re describing and may recognize when you alter the real world in any way. If you must take creative license and change something, do it sparingly."

Jim C.

I love Dan's enthusiasm. I'm actually a screenwriter, but I tend to write mystery with puzzle-like elements, twists and turns, so Dan's class is really on the mark for me. I too spend a long time building my world before I write, which can make you feel like you're not moving forward at times, but you are. When you do finally begin to write, Dan's advise about leaving X's to fill-in later is excellent, should you hit a wall and stall. I think it's too easy for a writer to get stuck on a moment, rather than simply move forward and let the answer percolate and reveal itself. It usually does. Just keep writing. My research approach is not unlike what Dan suggests -

Kathy O.

The generosity of Dan Brown in this Masterclass feels unreal. How could I be so blessed as to come across a class that oozes over with so much information? It lends to all writing, not just thrillers, it’s also a guide into other facets of art. Ohhh thank you Dan Brown, I’m gonna reflect on this for a long time.

Elaine

"You do not need to have total mastery of your subject matter to start a novel, only to finish it." Thank you!

John D M.

This is tough - but if it was easy, everybody would be doing it - right? Thank you, Dan, for reminding me I need to take the process one step at a time.

Veit E.

A lot new stuff to learn. Even though I have written 8 bestsellers for the German market and some European countries. Interestingly, 4 also at the publisher(Bastei Lübbe) where Dan Browns German translations are issued. One of the chief editors met Dan occasionally. Anyway, great masterclass, where even established writers can learn new things. https://veit-etzold-autor.de (english version to follow soon)

Rich G.

I understand "procrastination" and the VARIETY of reasons it is employed. I will spend my whole life fighting that problem. However, when you are aware of it and when you are doing it, it can be overcome.

John T.

Relevant and interesting article by Jessica Barry on the website "Criminal Element" on how she conducted research to write her highly-anticipated novel, Freefall. "For me, research is one of its undiluted pleasures. Filling up a notebook with things you didn’t know before and that – at least tangentially – will help you shape your story and your characters’ lives is really satisfying. The research for this book was particularly so because it felt like I was learning something genuinely useful along the way – and something I very likely would never have thought to learn about otherwise." Read the entire article here: https://www.criminalelement.com/taming-the-wilderness-jessica-barry-on-how-to-write-survival-fiction/

A fellow student

"Don't let research become procrastination." He hurt my feelings when he said that. I felt like he was talking directly to me. Sometimes my fear of failure and having to admit to the world that I just can't cut it as a writer turns into "research" for a story that I end up locking away because I found another idea I'd like to work on instead. Wow, thank you Mr. Brown.