From Malcolm Gladwell's MasterClass

Drafts and Revisions

Getting a piece of writing to a finished state is a process. Malcolm walks you through his approach, from first draft to final polishing.

Topics include: Set a Reasonable Bar • Just Get It Down • Write as You Research • Writer’s Block: Just Keep Writing • Work Backward From Your Ending • Put It Down and Walk Away • Edit for Clarity

Play

Getting a piece of writing to a finished state is a process. Malcolm walks you through his approach, from first draft to final polishing.

Topics include: Set a Reasonable Bar • Just Get It Down • Write as You Research • Writer’s Block: Just Keep Writing • Work Backward From Your Ending • Put It Down and Walk Away • Edit for Clarity

Malcolm Gladwell

Teaches Writing

Learn More

Preview

To me, the most important thing is, what is your expectation as a writer? How much you can write? I think it's very important to set a realistic expectation. So the feeling of failure that writers sometimes have is very often caused by the fact they have too high an expectation for how much they can produce in a given day or given sitting. Or they'll say, ugh, I only did two paragraphs today, and they'll feel like a failure. And it'll cause anxiety, and they won't sleep. The next day, they'll wake up. And they'll be exhausted and full of stress and won't be able to write. The truth is, you can't write a lot in a day. Can't-- it's demanding creative work. It's physically strenuous. It's mentally strenuous. It wears you out. I often find myself mulling over something just in my head for 10 times longer than that I would actually spend writing that section. A productive day for me is a day where if I have a good page, I'm delighted. If a book is 300 pages, and I do a good page in a day, that suggests I can do a book in a reasonable period of time. That's a lot, actually. But there are some writers who if I told-- what is a page 3 and 1/2 paragraphs, four paragraphs? Some writers would say if I only did four paragraphs in a day, I failed. Again, you set yourself up for disappointment. If you raise the bar that high, a few good paragraphs represent a substantial achievement. So once you think about it that way, you think, well, when I think about it, I think if I get up in the morning and do my writing well, my mind is fresh. I should be able to accomplish what I need to accomplish by lunchtime. So I work in the mornings, and I rarely do anything of creative value. In the afternoon, organize my life and organize the next days, do my reporting, and all those kinds of things. But the morning is if I can do a couple of good hours in the morning, then I feel like I have moved the bar that day-- moved the ball that day, rather. [MUSIC PLAYING] The perfect is the enemy of the good is one of the most important aphorisms I repeat to myself. So if you're trying to produce the perfect piece, you'll never produce it. So you have to accept the fact that your first couple of drops are going to be bad. They're always bad. By definition, they're bad. You don't know what you're doing yet. But it's very important to go through the stage of just getting things on the page. And also, the act of expanding your argument or make or telling your story is how the story emerges. You figure out how to tell the story as you tell it necessarily. Responding to pieces that you think will work together don't work together, or pieces you think don't work together do unexpectedly, where you find ways to link things just in the moment as you're writing. So you have to trust that process and just get things down-- so when I start, I'm just getting things down on the page. And I have big gaps. Or if I have problems I can't resolve, I just don't resolv...

Transform the ordinary

Ketchup. Crime. Quarterbacks. Thanks to Malcolm Gladwell’s books, these ordinary subjects have helped millions of readers grasp complex ideas like behavioral economics and performance prediction. Now, the renowned storyteller and best-selling author of Blink and The Tipping Point is teaching his first online writing class. Craft stories that captivate by learning how Malcolm researches topics, crafts characters, and distills big ideas into simple, powerful narratives.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

Malcolm was fantastic! I am not a writer per se, however, he was engaging, interesting and provided tremendous insight on life itself, which can be applied to any profession. And he inspired me to improve my writing skills and thought-processes for the aspiring author inside of myself. Thank you!!

This is awesome. I am going to re-do this course again soon.

I truly enjoy Malcolm Gladwell's work. I find learning to write from him to be a privilege. The course is done well and insightful. I will likely go through it again in hopes that my own writing will continue to improve.

A lot of practical knowledge! Going to be coming back to this class continuously for reference.

Comments

Katherine T.

Malcolm is delightful. He has a passion for his work and glows. His eagerness is contagious and inspiring. His instructions are easy to follow and understand. His tips and strategies are well thought-out. He clearly put a lot of work into his presentations, his class. His is the kind of writing I'd like to achieve. Who wouldn't??? I feel grateful to have the opportunity to hear him speak to me and share his "secrets." I'm sure I'll be using them - or trying to - in all of my continued writings. I write about nutrition, and it seems like I'm always preaching to the choir. I would like to write in surprising ways, to catch the reader and keep them. I have been a columnist for The Washington Post, Shape Magazine, Vegetarian Times, etc, and a few articles for The Washington Post went viral (5 So-Called Health Foods You Should Avoid). I believe what I write about is life-saving and people would benefit from reading my stories. But they don't! So, it must be the way I'm writing is a problem. It's probably just plain bor-ing! I'm hoping Malcolm will help me find ways to capture and keep my readers and to inspire them to make positive changes in their lives, or at least think about it. I've written a book (Diet Simple: 195 Mental Tricks, Substitutions, Habits & Inspirations) that I'm proud of, but I don't make much money from it. I'd like to write a best-seller that will tell some truths about dieting, that will surprise and delight them. But I must improve the way I communicate on the written page. Thank you Malcolm for being so generous with your talent! Katherine Tallmadge

Karen

He let out a lot of air in the over inflated balloon for me and reshaped it into one that we all can use. Writing as little as a page, a few paragraphs, and a couple of paragraphs was a sigh of relief. I thought writers wrote almost near perfect chapters at a time. To write in the morning works for him and I have found taking this Master Class while working on my book works best for me in the morning. Most helpful today was Malcolm's tips working backwards from the end. I was stuck and his words helped tremendously.

Bevis L.

It struck me how he said he works in the mornings best, for a couple hours or so, I may not get much more substantial creative work done in a day. I find that too so that’s reassuring

Jacqueline W.

Malcolm, do you do a substantial amount of outlining? I’m asking this question because of the advice given on writer’s block.

Ekin Ö.

Well, working from backward looks like a great tool! And I love how he altered Frank Sinatra's song. :-) By the way, the suggestion to keep writing does wonder. I'm a software developer, and I see programming as a creative craft. Whenever I get a writer's block, I keep writing code, and it works itself out.

Brett G.

His wedding song example was awesome. I've always thought my best stories were the ones where I knew the ending before I knew the beginning. Cool to have MG illustrate it so well.

Kristi D.

Love his take on putting down creative work and walking away. That mental respite enables perspective we can't access any other way.

KONRAD R.

A few paragraphs a day? Holly God! And this guy cranks out best sellers like a iHop pancake chef? All I want to know is what coffee he drinks? Talk about patience! Refer to my prior post about Michelangelo and patience! As for me, I've gained even more respect for Mr.Gladwell! PS. Thanks for this interview about Dyslexia : https://youtu.be/5pZ9jx78pVE

Rohit S.

The link to The Moth video that Gladwell mentions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAQ98KPLGWk It's definitely worth watching!

Ruth W.

Malcolm saying doing his writing in the morning makes so much sense. And also not set yourself to write a whole chapter. I've given up many times because I set the bar to high.