From Martin Scorsese's MasterClass

Promoting Your Film

Martin recommends promotional strategies and teaches you how to identify and target your film's potential audience.

Topics include: Let the Audience Know the Picture Is Out There • Find Your Audience • A Strong Poster Can Help Sell Your Film • Be Open to Marketing Ideas

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Martin recommends promotional strategies and teaches you how to identify and target your film's potential audience.

Topics include: Let the Audience Know the Picture Is Out There • Find Your Audience • A Strong Poster Can Help Sell Your Film • Be Open to Marketing Ideas

Martin Scorsese

Teaches Filmmaking

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Ultimately, A film, when it's completed, there was a period of time where I remember the first films opening up, doing some interviews, press interviews. Very little television. Well, the point is this. That if you're in narrative cinema, and you're making films, you're an American filmmaker, whether you make them in New York, or Chicago, in Austin, Texas and everything. Kind around the world, they feel they're Hollywood films, even if they're of a different style. But particularly back in the early '70s, all the way through the '70s, they were coming out of Hollywood, in a way. Even though some of them were shot in New York and edited here, they really were. So once they were picked up for distribution, the distribution companies were the Hollywood companies. At least the films that I made. You know? And so these had to go through the Hollywood studio system, in terms of letting the audience know the film is out there. You write a book, you've got to let people know it's there. You know? You do a film, you've got to let them know it's there. Whether you do it, and it's Michael Snow's Wavelength, or whether it's Godfather I, you know, Godfather II. I mean, there's an audience. A certain kind of audience, too. I don't say each film, every film is for the widest range you can. Once you do that, you're creating an effect in the film that is watering down the picture. So if you find that you made a film that you feel strongly about, you feel you get as truthful as possible in it, there might be an audience out there for it. Now, you've got to go out and present it to an audience. How is that done? In many different ways. Usually it's the actors. People want to see certain actors in there. In the case of certain individual films made in the '60s and early '70s, there was critical reaction. There were certain critics around that were very, very powerful at the time. You had to let the audience know that the picture is out there, so you find that particularly at that time, you could have input in the trailers, coming attractions. You certainly could have input in the posters, in the publicity campaign. You've got to be part of all of it. I remember when Bonnie and Clyde was made, Warren Beatty produced it. And it was killed by The New York Times. The review. And what Beatty did was, as a producer of the film, he took a print of the picture by hand, in a hand, in these cans, and went from town to town. And went on every television show and promoted the film. As a side point, The New York Times reviewed the film positively. But that was also a watershed moment, because American cinema was changing so much, and Bonnie and Clyde was at the forefront of that. Arthur Penn and Beatty. But this was the way. You believe in the film, you go out, and you talk about it as best you can. There were different k...

Study with Scorsese

Martin Scorsese drew his first storyboard when he was eight. Today he’s a legendary director whose films from Mean Streets to The Wolf of Wall Street have shaped movie history. In his first-ever online film class, the Oscar winner teaches his approach, from storytelling to editing to working with actors. He deconstructs films and breaks down his craft, changing how you make and watch movies.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

I'm an author finishing up my first book. Even though the book may never make it to the light of the camera, I learned many things of value from Martin. "You may have to lose scenes you love." "Using sounds to solve problems." If this is true for movies, it certainly is true for books. Martin, your smiles and laughter lit the camera up! Beautiful.

This class was tremendously more valuable than the first one I tried. I think more practical lessons would be valuable.

Gave me three words which will stick with me forever... do it anyway

This was a great series of educational videos from my favorite director of all time. Martin Scorsese's enthusiasm and detailed passion for his work is so inspiring for a young filmmaker like myself.

Comments

EK T.

On his level, you start hearing about his films when he starts casting and you know you are going to see it, no matter the content.

Rowan S.

I feel he's really behind the curve on this topic, as he's just not familiar with the powerful opportunities presented by social media and internet marketing. That said, I'm still loving this series.

Anastacia S.

Martin has so much to say about all aspects of filmmaking that every word is literally an education. I feel so fortunate to have access to this and only wish his course were longer.

Gene B.

Without an audience, your film won't be known. It's important to know your audiences for your film as well as trying all the ways you possibly can as a filmmaker to make your film can publicity and let it be known by people, even if what you're doing in order to let your film gain some public attention might be out of your comfort zone.

Mia S.

"I find that I have to be very patient and open to many different ways, ideas from people who do sell films, so to speak. It's also a very complicated thing because in certain cases, some films were subject to a lot of contention during the shooting, editing - the studio fighting; as I say, years ago, when people could still do it, actors take away a film, the studio takes it away, the financiers take it away... then so when the film opens, they throw is away, basically. You could go out, take it and sell it. Now, 'go out' meaning go from town to town - well, today, you have the Internet. I'm behind on that, but all the information is out there. So how do you find it?"

Mia S.

"When 'Bonnie and Clyde' was made, Warren Beatty produced it, and it was killed by The New York Times, the review. And what Beatty did, he took a print of the picture in these cans, and went from town to town, went on every television show and promoted the film. As a side point, The New York Times re-reviewed the film positively. But that was also a watershed moment because American cinema was changing so much and 'Bonnie and Clyde' was at the forefront of that. But this was the way: you believe in the film, you go out and you talk about it as best you can. There are different kinds of reasons for doing it. In some cases, it's enjoyable - you had a good time with the people making the film, you go out, you enjoy yourself, you celebrate a little with the actors, people that worked on the film, the studio people. And if it makes it, it makes it. It doesn't, it doesn't, at least you tried. Other times, you've invested so much of your own money and your life into it, you'd better go out and talk about it, without over-saturating the market with yourself, so to speak. That includes the actor, the director, whatever. Other times it's good just to not do anything - just let it play. If it gets support and gets what they call 'word of mouth,' it's good to let it play. The key is, you have to let people - if you want people to see it - you've got to let them know it's there. 'Taxi Driver' did very well at the box office - I hadn't thought it would. I was intent on using a certain kind of poster for the picture, and they allowed us to get the posters made - different images, one beautiful one by Guy Pellaert is extraordinary; but the one that did the most for the picture was just a simple still from the movie itself. Kind of a black and white, but a lavender finish to it, and just a shot of De Niro walking up 8th Avenue. That sold the picture. If you had asked me to say what poster or image was going to sell the film, I wouldn't have said that, but it did."

Mia S.

"Ultimately, a film, when it's completed - there was a period of time where I remember the first films opening up, doing some interviews - press interviews, very little television. The point is that if you're in narrative cinema and you're making films - you're an American filmmaker, whether you make them in New York, or Chicago, in Austin, Texas - kind of around the world, they feel they're Hollywood films, even if they're of a different style. Particularly back in the early 70s, all the way through the 70s, they were coming out of Hollywood, in a way. Even though some of them were shot in New York. and edited here, they really were. Once they were picked up for distribution, the distribution companies were the Hollywood companies. at least the films that I made; and so these had to go through the Hollywood studio system, in terms of letting the audience know the film is out there. You write a book, you've got to let people know it's there. You do a film, you've got to let them know it's there. Whether you do it and it's Michael Snow's 'Wavelength' or it's 'Godfather I, II,' there's an audience - a certain kind of audience, too. I don't say each film, every film is for the widest range you can... once you do that, you're creating an effect in the film that is watering down the picture. So if you find that you made a film that you feel strongly about, you feel you get as truthful as possible in it, there might be an audience out there for it. Now you've got to go out and present it to an audience. How is that done? In many different ways. Usually it's the actors - people want to see certain actors in there. In the case of certain individual films made in the 60s, early 70s, there was critical reaction - there were certain critics around that were very powerful at the time. You had to let the audience know that the picture is out there, so you find that particularly at that time, you could have input in the trailers, 'coming attractions,' you certainly could have input in the posters, publicity campaign. You've got to be part of all of it."

Ross K.

I would rate this chapter as the weakest but there is no fault of Martin Scorsese here! He is a brilliant film director and the course has been very productive and useful for me. The problem is that he acted in 1970s when promoting his films and after that he became famous, so, generally speaking, he got his promotion by the word of mouth. Nowadays, the promotion and marketing of anything is in sheer contrast with the not so distant past, The entire concept varies from the pre-Internet epoch. So, this is the only chapter where i can take the advice of the Scorsese partly and cautiously. But, as I said, so far this is the course I've taken on Masterclass so far.

Alejandro M.

In the cinema of the 21st century, in the information age, the center of the world is the screen. Each place, let's say, is a fragment of reality that makes up the map of global cinema. The cinema is a mirror of reality, of history and of the society of its time. It is the viewer and the life that reflects the cinema. Cine Riera *** Art Films http://cineriera.es/

Timoteo Ry

Deniro's walk down 5th Avenue in Taxi Driver, served as the poster child for movies at that time. Going out and talking about the film in public is another good idea from what I gathered from this lesson. If you want people to see that film, you got to market it, and let people know it's out there!