From Alice Waters's MasterClass

A Vegetable Lunch: Roasted, Steamed, and Raw

Alice walks you through her process of planning an India-inspired lunch based on the ingredients in her shopping basket. Learn how to prepare vegetables three ways, and reach into your pantry to round out the meal.

Topics include: Timing Your Cooking • Roast for Intense Flavors • Steam for Delicate Flavors • A Raw Salad: Marrying Texture and Flavor • An Everyday Sauce: Yogurt Raita • Plate and Serve Lunch

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Alice walks you through her process of planning an India-inspired lunch based on the ingredients in her shopping basket. Learn how to prepare vegetables three ways, and reach into your pantry to round out the meal.

Topics include: Timing Your Cooking • Roast for Intense Flavors • Steam for Delicate Flavors • A Raw Salad: Marrying Texture and Flavor • An Everyday Sauce: Yogurt Raita • Plate and Serve Lunch

Alice Waters

Teaches The Art of Home Cooking

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ALICE WATERS: Simplicity, as in this lunch menu, is incredibly valuable. It doesn't mean you haven't thought something through. In fact, it's the reverse. You've thought it through so well that you can just do it simply. I decided I'm going to make a little lunch with all of these ingredients here. And I'm trying to really think about timing. What do I need to do right at the last minute? And what do I need to do ahead of time? I'm thinking of roasting the squash with some of this kaffir lime leaves from my garden. I'll just chop them up and put them in with the squash. While the squash is cooking, I'm going to make a carrot salad with cumin. That's perfect for the timing. And then I'm going to make a little raita, so that we all go with it all of these vegetables that I'm cooking. And I'm going to warm up the rice, add some coriander that I already chopped. And the very last thing I'm going to do is steam the turnips. When you roast something, it intensifies the flavor. And really, any vegetable, it's pretty much wonderful roasted in the oven, just with a little olive oil and some salt. And squash, it's exceptional. I'm going to take off the ends, and I'm going to peel it a little bit, but not too much. I love the kind of look of the whole vegetable after it's cooked. So I'm going to leave a little bit of the skin on there. And again, all scraps in my compost. What I'm going to do is cut this in half and cut it this way so that I don't endanger myself. And then I'm going to bring my compost over here and take out the seeds. [SCRAPING] And now I'm going to cut these [CHOPPING] in very even pieces. That's what's important, so that they all cook at the same time. If you cut them too thinly, they won't have the really beautiful, soft part in the center. And I'm just going to cut up a little bit of this, because I want it to release its oils. And I'm not being very careful about it, because I'm going to take them out before I put the squash on the plate. OK. Now I'm going to put the squash in the bowl and season it. I think I'll put these kaffir limes in the bowl too, leaves. Pour a little olive oil over, some salt, a little bit more. Toss them. And then I'm going to lay them out on the baking pan. Maybe a little bit of red pepper flakes too. Then I'm going to put them in a very hot oven-- it's about 400 degrees. And they'll take, oh, I'd say, maybe 20 or 25 minutes to cook. It's amazing what happens to vegetables when they're simply roasted with olive oil and salt. Even the oddest vegetable that you could possibly imagine-- like kohlrabi-- is transformed when you cut it and roast it. The reasons that I wanted to steam them is that this time of year, they are incredibly sweet. These are new turnips, they aren't the turnips that have been stored during the winter. And I would think about it very different. I might roast the turnips at another time. Now these here are a little bit bigger t...

Farm-to-table cooking

Alice Waters started America’s farm-to-table revolution. When she founded the iconic restaurant Chez Panisse, her local, organic ingredients sparked a movement and earned her the James Beard Award for Outstanding Chef. In her first-ever online cooking class, Alice opens the doors of her home kitchen to teach you how to pick seasonal ingredients, create healthy and beautiful meals, and change your life by changing the food you make at home.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

I have learned so much from this class. Most importantly, Alice has me excited about real food again. In this fast paced, diet culture I have lost sight of that love I have for cooking and nourishment. This class was a true gift and I plan to watch it again.

A beautiful visual illustration of the concepts I've learned using many of the Chez Panisse cookbooks. It's even more powerful hearing from Alice herself and seeing her work in the kitchen.

Great MasterClass and showing appreciation of the cooking process and produce. Would've liked to have more demonstration of recipes/techniques.

Alice, thank you for sharing your passion for cooking with me. I love cooking for my family and friends, it’s always from the heart.

Comments

Manabu T.

Lovely, Alice said she would attach the recipe to make yoghurt. Where can we find it?

Dianna Z.

I love roasting vegetables. Never thought of some of these options for roasting though - now I'm curious about the flavor.

Simone M.

I loved this lesson. I've never imagined myself using the knife Alice used, but it looks so much more practical. Being a pescatarian, I love her choice of vegetables and I will be talking onboard her advice to roast more of them.

Rocio T.

I'm enjoying this as you have no idea. I know that for health I need to eat more vegetables but since I'm not their friend I don't know how to cook or pair them... this is the answer to my prayers, it seems.

Liza D.

I finally found the Kaffir Lime Leaves and proceeded to make this amazingly easy lunch. Every dish had an explosion of flavor! I'm looking forward to making this lunch for my friends and family. What a treat!

A fellow student

I love the carrot salad...so simple and it looks delicious. I wonder what knife Alice is using?

A fellow student

Lovely. I had never cut my squash this way before roasting -- I will be trying it with my acorn squash this week. Also - nice to see all veggies -- I have been having many meatless meals and I think I need to add a bit more variety at each meal - like this..

Joyce Kidd

I like the information that Alice imparts about which vegetables are best steamed or best roasted. Not sure I'm ready to buy first and plan later though. Was that parchment paper on the baking sheet? I never use it but it looks like a good idea for soaking up excess oil.

Max E.

Wow: I wish all those items were in season right now so that I could recreate that. I must confess I am such a planner, list person, it feels very uncomfortable to think of just going to the market and finding whats there and going from there. I have a family of 8 with many different activities. I have needed to take some of the thinking out of meal planning for convenience sake. But, I am open and looking forward to understanding and learning something new, because I can see how much more healthy and enjoyable this will be.

Ami G.

I like the concept of mixing a crunchy carrot salad with the other hot items, on the same plate.