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Business, Politics & Society

Creating Brand Value

Bob Iger

Lesson time 15:10 min

It goes without saying that the Disney brand is powerful. Bob explains why the brand needed to evolve while staying true to its core in order to stay relevant.

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Bob Iger
Teaches Business Strategy and Leadership
Former Disney CEO Bob Iger teaches you the leadership skills and strategies he used to reimagine one of the world’s most beloved brands.
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[HORN BLOWS] [MUSIC PLAYING] - When you create a brand, I think you have to immediately ask yourself the question, when I put that brand name on the product or when I say that brand name to a consumer, what does it convey? What are the specific values, the specific features, the specific brand attributes, that that consumer immediately thinks about or feels or wants when they hear that name? So when I-- if I had an ice cream company, and I put my name on a container of the ice cream, I want the consumer who sees that name on the ice cream container to immediately know something about the ice cream they're either about to buy, or they're about to eat. You know, a brand is also very, very important in terms of the price value proposition to a consumer. In today's world, the consumer's making many, many choices-- how to spend their time, how to spend their money. In many cases, because there's so much product out there, just the decision about what to do next, what to spend money on next, needs to be made very quickly. And what a brand can convey is in a sense what a product is so that a consumer has the ability to decide quickly whether to spend time or money on that, trusting that in doing so, they're going to derive value from that transaction. A strong brand is something that creates almost a chemical reaction in someone as soon as they hear that name or that brand name. If I say to you Disney, you know exactly what it is. There's a feeling inside you either because you've, you've consumed the brand in some form, or it's had an impact on your life. I could mention Nike. I could mention Apple. I could list a number of them. And you immediately have a visceral feeling about it. What that says is that a strong brand is something that is very identifiable in terms of its qualities, its attributes, its values, what it stands for. The beauty of Disney is a lot of the stories that we tell are evergreen in nature, meaning they have relevance to generation after generation after generation. I tell a story about being taken to the movies when I was four or five years old to see "Cinderella." And just this last Christmas, I watched the same movie with two of my grandchildren. That's five generations of one family that watched the same Disney movie and enjoyed it. That's what I mean when I use the word evergreen. And it's a great attribute of the Disney storytelling brand. [MUSIC PLAYING] In many respects, a brand is a very, very careful balance between legacy or heritage and innovation. Because the world is changing so much and so quickly, it's important for brands, in order to be healthy, to continue to be relevant. Over the years, there've been a lot of discussions about how best to keep the Disney brand relevant and vital in a changing world. The Disney brand really was created in 1923 when the company was created. And it's now almost a hundred years old. And so you can imagine the pressure on that brand i...


Embrace risk, build resilience

In an era of disruption, former Disney CEO Bob Iger led one of the world’s most beloved brands to unprecedented success with the acquisitions of Pixar, Marvel, and Lucasfilm. Now, through case studies and lessons from 45 years in media, Bob teaches you how to evolve your business and career. Learn strategies for expanding a brand, leading with integrity, and making big moves—from risk management to the art of negotiation.



Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

So many pearls of wisdom included in this master class with Bob Iger. He is clearly a person of integrity, intelligence and grace under pressure. It was interesting that the first thing he included is good habits and self care. 10 pages of notes and reflections as I watched and lots to apply to my workplace. Thanks for doing this Mr. Iger!

I loved this class. Mr. Iger is a true creative visionary & leader. He has brought so much to Disney, humanity & the world. Great content & lessons.

very inspiring to hear Bob Iger on how he manage Disney as CEO and his management philosophies.

I loved hearing Bob speak. He is so inspiring and strategic, and I hope I could lead a company the way he does some day.


Comments

Brian H.

Nice to see a little clip from “Steamboat Willie!” I love early films, both animated and otherwise. (“Gertie the Dinosaur,” anyone?) One filmmaker who has always fascinated me is Charlie Bowers, who did some amazing things combining live slapstick with animation. For a good example, check out “Now You Tell One” (1926).

Chi

It would be helpful if be talk more about his failures and how he solved the problems. I am pretty sure a man like him encountered + intelligently solved many

Yancy Y.

This lesson was an excellent breakdown for me regarding brand value. When we talk about working with traditionalists, I think about formulaic path dependence, in which we find ourselves sticking to a formula that has proven successful in the past. I like how he pointed out the difference between reverence and respect. I think sometimes we don't change out of fear and a lack of understanding of our brands. This lesson also makes me think about myself as a brand or my department as a brand. How are we cultivating our brand internally? What are we doing to build relationships with our colleagues? There's a lot of great food for thought here.

Ashley Jo G.

Yes!! Giving girls role models that find the strength and power within themselves is so powerful!

Lucia C.

Growing up watching the Disney princesses I can absolutely relate with the need of a princess that went beyond the traditional attributes; strong, determined, self-sufficient, etc. Watching Elsa and Moana take impersonate those new attributes absolutely changed the game. I smile thinking about their power! that's what the brand conveys. As far as the lesson, I can agree on sharing a bit more specifics that apply to other contexts as well; but I do see the way Bob shares a story with SO MUCH applicability and knowledge transfer to any entrepreneur. The lessons are on-point, it's on our side to make that reflection and transfer, such as what does Respect vs. Reverence means to my company? What do I want my costumes/participants to feel when they hear the name of my brand? These are all relevant questions to ask ourselves in that pursuit of success. Thank you!

Harry C.

As I listened to Bob Iger discussing the importance of brand value at Disney, I felt that feeling I have when I see the Disney castle at the beginning of their films and hear that music; it really is absolutely astonishing just how much of an impact the Disney brand has. I really think that a great company can make the consumer feel something with just a name, a word, which is the embodiement of brand value.

Tanja

The lessons are quite interesting and I understood how valuable storytelling is for a brand. I hope I can transform some of the insights to building our 50 year old brand.

Vittoria

I think these lessons are very valuable, although they are quite vague and are not really "business classes". Each and every single thing he talks about is validated by his experience and it was very helpful to me, personally. My biggest take away has to be "creating brand value".

Jose Juan C.

Amazing! Managing Branding its my favorite part in Marketing. I have my own company with a 50 year brand and this information its really healpfull.

Anthony M.

interesting stories but so far it's just that. Stories of Bob's past and not actual business insights or techniques. His notes on negotiation are the most common points that are of "common knowledge" in the business world. I feel like this is more of a short docu-series than a business class.