From Dr. Jane Goodall's MasterClass

Animal Cruelty

Dr. Jane has observed many forms of animal cruelty. Here, she relates some of them in order to shed light on the problem and teach us how to give animals the respect they deserve.

Topics include: Medical Research • Developing an Alternative • Zoos • A Different Perspective

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Dr. Jane has observed many forms of animal cruelty. Here, she relates some of them in order to shed light on the problem and teach us how to give animals the respect they deserve.

Topics include: Medical Research • Developing an Alternative • Zoos • A Different Perspective

Dr. Jane Goodall

Teaches Conservation

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I often think back to that 1986 conference when, for the first time, I saw secretly filmed video footage of the unbelievable cruelty to chimpanzees in medical research laboratories. And the thing I discovered, as I began to learn more about it, is that scientists were really excited, because chimpanzees biologically are so like us that they thought, well, here is the perfect model. We can infect these chimpanzees, biologically so like us, with diseases which other animals cannot be infected with, because they're less like us. Therefore, here is the model to infect a chimpanzee and then test out various vaccines and cures. The problem was these same scientists were not prepared to admit the equally striking similarities between chimpanzees psychologically, behaviorally, and-- above all-- emotionally. And for me, it was heartbreaking. And in order to try and do something about it, it meant that I had to find out more about it. So just as I went to Africa to learn more about the problems faced by the chimpanzees, I had to visit medical research laboratories. And those visits-- they were so shocking to me, to actually see, with my own eyes, infant chimpanzees, at that time, kept in something about the size of an average microwave oven-- a bit taller. Probably about so big. It was 22 by 22 inches. And air went in by a vent. And the only contact they had with people was when the door was opened and a white-coated figure would give them an injection or, perhaps, hand them some food. And these chimpanzees-- so social, confined by themselves, snatched from their mothers-- they were totally depressed. And when child psychologists saw these images, they said, well, this is how very emotionally deprived human children behave. They would rock from side to side. Their eyes were blank. How did science even begin to believe that such a emotionally-compromised creature could behave like a normal human being? It just wasn't possible. And so, because nothing will change overnight, this long, long battle for chimpanzees in medical research, which I promised them-- when I saw them in that first lab, I promised them, I would do my best. And I saw many other chimps in many other labs. And it began with, well, at least let's give them better conditions. Let's give them a better life. And it was very, very difficult. And fortunately, other organizations took up the battle, because I couldn't have done it alone. Finally, the National Institutes of Health conducted 18 months of surveys of all experiments being done with their chimpanzees, which was nearly 400 chimps, and came to the conclusion-- and these were their own experts who'd been asked two questions. Will the experiment you're investigating lead to progress in human health? Or will it potentially lead to progress in human health? And after 18 months and investigating I don't know how many protocols, the answ...

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There is still a window of time. Nature can win if we give her a chance. In her first ever online class, Dr. Jane Goodall teaches how you can conserve the environment. She also shares her research on the behavioral patterns of chimpanzees and what they taught her about conservation. You'll learn how to act locally and protect the planet.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

I took the class to thank Jane for her years of experience. Her perspective on current issues was very interesting and helpful!

Many thanks for this opportunity. Dr Jane is amazing.

I am inspire by Jane and feel the lesson was a wonderful lead-in for the rest of the class.

Jane Goodall is an amazing person... her knowledge and her way of seeing things must be spread all over the world. I loved the class.. .I am kind of sad that it ended. Many thanks!

Comments

Belinda M.

Amazing to hear those words 'how does the animal feel?' The fear and terror, experienced by every animal going to slaughter, the lack of touch, and emotion for animals in captivity whether for entertainment, experimental reasons. To find a way to ask people to respect ALL animals, not just their dog! The story of the bees protecting the farm from the elephants raids, I watched the documentary, and the farmer had the utmost respect for the elephants, and the bees who he made guardians of his land. Fabulous and we should see this, all around the world. its not using the animal, its respecting the animal, and helping each other.

willowtreeblues@gmail.com

I studied Biology at the University of Glasgow. On the first day of the course, we had to make an agreement to assent to all use of animals, live and killed for our education, during our course. It was so absolute, no discussion, no exploration of ethics - a large group of new students, many of them only 17 and 18 (I was older, 24, but in Scotland many people start at 17), were given no choice - to refuse would mean to give up the course they had been accepted on, on the first day! I felt really uncomfortable with that forced decision, and in fact I did question the killing of animals for our teaching in the second year. But how many young people going through that education system learned from the start to switch off their questioning and personal ethical development? I still look back with some frustration both at the requirement made of us, and the manner in which it was presented to us by the University.

Vanessa G.

I work on IACUCS and Animal welfare in Guatemala and I have to say: Jane is my spirit animal! (I thought it was chimps... ) and I know she is one of few peole like me, that will be honored to be called an animal!)

AnimalLover

I am thankful in this video that there was only Jane's description of what she witnessed. I think the humans who treat animals this way, by keeping them in catches, depriving them of company etc. forget what it would be like for us to experience the same thing. Like chimps, humans are social animals and we would go to pieces if exposed to the same treatment. It's heartless and thoughtless, and these are the sorts of processes that need re-evaluating all the time, not only for efficacy but for ethicality.

Mia S.

"I would be the last person to say that research with animals has never benefited humanity; it has. I know it has, because my mother was saved by replacing a faulty valve in her heart with what was called a bio-plasticized valve from the heart of a commercially-slaughtered pig. How do you treat the pigs whose heart valves you're going to use to treat people? I went to a birthday party, for me. The host came up to me and said, 'There's a woman here. She belongs to a group that is fighting for the continuation of all animal experiments - she wants to come and tackle you, shall I keep her away?' I said, 'No, don't.' She came, she was absolutely furious; she was typical of the anger and, 'How dare you do this? My daughter died because of something, and you want to stop all progress like that.' I said, 'No no, wait a minute. My mother had a pig valve, the result of experimentation on the pig. Because of that, her life was saved. We began really thinking about, Can we in the future develop a different way? You say your daughter was saved by experimentation on dogs - how were the dogs treated? Don't you feel really grateful to the dog who saved your daughter's life? Don't you feel you want to help in any way you can?' She looked and me, said, 'I never thought like that before. Of course, you're right. I'm just going off to a meeting of my group - I'm going to tell them exactly what you said. I'm a different person, from now on. Thank you.' So you know - what's going on in the animal's mind? All sorts of animals - it makes us think differently about how we treat them. They're not just things, they're sentient and sapient. The sooner we learn that, the better. 'Personality on our Plates.' That makes you think. Then more we learn about the animal's intellect and their sentience, the more we have to think - as responsible beings on this planet, how we treat the other beings with whom we share or should share this planet."

Mia S.

"As with everything, nothing's black and white. We can't say, 'Nothing is useful.' I would never say that. But we do have to weigh up the ethical and moral implications of how we treat the animals, whether they're chimpanzees or monkeys or rats. How do we treat them? Are the ends justifying the means? Can we do it better, differently? I'm always being asked, what do I think of zoos? The answer is, there are zoos and zoos - zoos that should be closed today or should have been closed long ago, the bad roadside zoos, zoos in developing countries where people haven't understood - the kind of old-fashioned zoo, with the bare cement floor, the terrible problem of boredom. Some animals that should never be in captivity - orcas, dolphins, whales like the beluga whales; elephants, unless they've got a huge area like a sanctuary. But zoos are getting better - I have to admit that there is something for a small child about being in the presence of an animal in a really good enclosure - a happy animal. We've now admitted that animals have emotions, which can include sadness, depression, happiness, and joy. For a child to be able to look an animal in the eye - people say, 'The child can learn everything from television.' But it's not the same. A child with a real, live animal - there's a smell, a sense of beingness, and presence, which you can never get from a television screen. Some of these ethical issues relating to animal experimentation - there's no black and white. It's all fuzzy gray."

Mia S.

"Because nothing will change overnight, this long battle for chimpanzees in medical research, which I promised them when I saw them in that first lab, I would do my best. I saw many other chimps in many other labs, and it began with, 'At least let's give them better conditions, let's give them a better life.' It was very difficult. Fortunately, other organizations took up the battle, because I couldn't have done it alone. Finally, the National Institutes of Health conducted 18 months of surveys of all experiments being done with their chimpanzees, which was nearly 400 chimps, and came to the conclusion - these twere their own experts who'd been asked two questions: Will the experiment you're investigating lead to progress in human health? Or will it potentially lead to progress in human health? After 18 months, investigating I don't know how many protocols, the answer was, none of them. That's when the director of the NIH said, 'All these chimpanzees will be retired to sanctuaries. We're not continuing to imprison them in these inappropriate conditions, when the answer is so negative as to that impact on human health.' We still have a long way to go. There are still chimpanzees and other creatures in inappropriate conditions. But more and more, more evidence is coming out that experiments on these animals, who are often stressed and compromised in their immune system - they are not providing the answers that people hoped they would. These experiments are wasting the taxpayers' money, and there are now alternatives developed. There are new things like tissue culture, cell culture, that can provide much more accurate ways of finding out about human health, and cures and vaccines. That's where we should be putting our money."

Mia S.

"I often think back to that 1986 conference when for the first time, I saw secretly filmed video footage of the unbelievable cruelty to chimpanzees in medical research laboratories. The thing I discovered, as I began to learn more about it, is that scientists were really excited, because chimpanzees biologically as so like us that they thought, 'Well, here is the perfect model. We can infect these chimpanzees with diseases which other animals cannot be infected with, because they're less like us. Therefore, here is the model: to infect a chimpanzee and then test out various vaccines and cures.' The problem was, these same scientists were not prepared to admit the equally striking similarities between chimpanzees psychologically, behaviorally, and above all, emotionally. For me it, was heartbreaking. In order to try and do something about it, it meant I had to find out more. Just as I went to Africa to learn more about the problems faced by the chimpanzees, I had to visit medical research laboratories. Those visits - they were so shocking to me, to actually see with my own eyes, infant chimpanzees kept in something about the size of an average microwave oven, a bit taller. 22 by 22 inches; air went in by a vent. The only contact they had with people was when the door was opened and a white-coated figure would give them an injection, perhaps hand them some food. These chimpanzees - so social, confined by themselves, snatched from their mothers - they were totally depressed. When child psychologists saw these images, they said, 'This is how very emotionally deprived children behave.' They would rock from side to side, their eyes were blank. How did science even begin to believe that such a emotionally-compromised creature could behave like a normal human being?"

Charlet C E.

Here in Arkansas we have a raging problem with people who need money (or some who simply want an easy way of making a few bucks) stealing people's dogs to sell to pet mills, but mainly to labs for experimentation. They usually steal dogs of equivalent age and similar enough breeding to pass them off as a litter because there are laws about what they call "Class B" breeders. Class B can sell to places for experimental use, etc, but for many reasons, others are not allowed. So these people will gather up a bunch of dogs and go sell them under the guise of being Class B breeders. If the dog is a purebred, they will often wait for the family to post a reward, then feign innocence and say they found the people's dog-claiming the reward. Additionally, these same "types" will steal people's dogs -if they happen to be pit bulls, to sell to fight brokers; if they happen to be other types of domestic dogs, they sell them cheaply to those same brokers as 'bait dogs' (and cats, rabbits, etc, and those animals are used as disposable training materials. Unfortunately, it is very hard to trace this activity and provide proof enough to convict/stop them. Law enforcement is often apathetic, having neither the manpower nor the time to dedicate to fighting this sort of activity.

Charlet C E.

I got into it with our local zoo once, over their bald eagles. They had two bald eagles in a pen meant for bears, although it wasn't really suitable for them, either. The birds were hunched up on the ground, moulting horribly (looked similar to mange in a fur-bearing animal), large areas of exposed flesh and sores-they looked like the photos of hens in those high-volume egg houses. As well, the enclosure they were in was bordered by one containing a bear and one containing a cougar. The enclosure was dirty, full of spent feathers, and had no place for them to get up high or "roost." All of the visitors were commenting on how bad they looked. The administrator wrote back to me and said this was a temporary enclosure-did I not see the areas that were roped-off for construction?? But my question was, how long would the construction last? Would the new enclosure be more naturally inviting to the birds? Why were they being housed in an inappropriate area near predators? Could they not be provided with a better place while they waited? He returned that I should think the eagles fortunate because both of them had been rescued-both had been shot by hunters or poachers and both had lost the use of one wing, so I should be 'thanking' him for helping these birds, that they would surely have died in the wild. From what I saw that day, the poor things would probably have preferred the wild death, although I did have to give his organization credit for rescuing them I guess.