Design, Photography, & Fashion

Case Study Part 1: Photographing Alice Waters

Annie Leibovitz

Lesson time 14:17 min

Annie brings you inside a photo shoot with the renowned chef Alice Waters. Learn how Annie built the concept for the photos, conducted research, and prepared for the shoot.

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Annie Leibovitz
Teaches Photography
Annie brings you into her studio and onto her shoots to teach you everything she knows about portraiture and telling stories through images.
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The Art Of The Photo

Annie Leibovitz was the first woman to be named chief photographer at Rolling Stone and the last person to take a portrait of John Lennon. In her first online photography class, Annie shows us that what makes a picture stunning isn’t the gear or technology—it’s the story. Annie teaches you her philosophy: how to develop concepts, work with subjects, shoot with natural light, and bring images to life in post-production. See the world through her eyes.



Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

I got so much out of this class. I am an experienced photographer so I was mainly interested in her workflow and thought process. I loved seeing her on set and working with others. I got some amazing tips for my future shoots and just thinking about them from a different angle.

Not a tachnical master class, more like an inspiration/motivation/reasoning, but still a great series of classes to watch and work on!

Annie in these short you Master class has helped me to shift my paradigm of how I look at photography. The assignments were challenging enough to help me "see" through my photos. Than you Annie. Much love and respect.

Thank you Annie for this class. I liked the tips and the fact that it didn't dwell on the technical side. Maybe some extra crunchy bits could have been nice but all in all a good lesson :)


Comments

Sean F.

This was the best lesson of the class. Very good. Learned about the whole process.

John E.

I have enjoyed every lesson thus far. This lesson taught me directing, looking back, photo essays, and working with other people’s opinions, especially other photographers. I love this MasterClass with Annie because her point of view tells me to be different is okay. I am comfortable with that. Wonderful teaching! Thanks!

Ayodele O.

I like the way the lecturer takes me through her thought process. Very calm and choice of words are descriptive but full of her passion which. makes it easy for me to follow her creative side.

Nera K.

To be honest, this chapter was really slow and boring. It took me many tries for watching it full cause i would fall asleep everytime. It would have been nice to at least get some technical info, as which camera and lens she used or something about the strobe and difussion.

J'nee H.

She suggested to try a portrait with a stylist, etc. So I wanted to explore a faceless portrait. Probably outside the rules/description but I love the composition and color and facelessness of my dancer subject.

Juanita B.

Can you provide some insight on the best camera and lens for a new photographer?

Brenda K.

I enjoy listening to Annie about when taking photos to look for the meaning and what is important to the subject. Even if the subject is an animal find the simple and what means something to that subject. So I took this photo a couple of days ago. How you have to be patient with exactly what you would like to capture on the photo. Very simple and yet like it is so natural. I am a beginner to all of this and that is why I am taking in all that she mentions about the subject and what to really search for in taking a photo to capture the best photo for that day.

A fellow student

This has really gotten stale. Annie talking about Annie. This is not Annie Leibovitz "teaches photography. " This is Annie teaching about Annie.

Charles B.

I learned some things in this lesson. Alice Waters, adding music (although I've thought about that before) during the shoot; the two most important aspects for me. I suggest Annie consider having a much larger canopy to shoot under. A parachute, for example, will allow ambient light and will help to keep her from being crowded with all the extra hands, and give the soft light she enjoys working with.

Jan K.

Again small idea, 20 people doing real work and Annie just pushing the button, that's all Pfftttt