From Annie Leibovitz's MasterClass

Portrait Photography

Annie discusses portraiture and photojournalism, and what makes portrait photography so compelling for her as a medium. Learn why Annie loves the photo series and why a single image cannot truly "capture" a person.*

Topics include: Photojournalism and Portraits • Capturing History • Photo Essays

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Annie discusses portraiture and photojournalism, and what makes portrait photography so compelling for her as a medium. Learn why Annie loves the photo series and why a single image cannot truly "capture" a person.*

Topics include: Photojournalism and Portraits • Capturing History • Photo Essays

Annie Leibovitz

Teaches Photography

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The Art Of The Photo

Annie Leibovitz was the first woman to be named chief photographer at Rolling Stone and the last person to take a portrait of John Lennon. In her first online photography class, Annie shows us that what makes a picture stunning isn’t the gear or technology—it’s the story. Annie teaches you her philosophy: how to develop concepts, work with subjects, shoot with natural light, and bring images to life in post-production. See the world through her eyes.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

I don't know yet, because I think what Annie's class is about needs time to distill into your own photography. It was very inspiring to hear her story and her thoughts about "good" (personal, artistic) photography. However there was little information that instantly helps you to improve as a photographer.

Annie's perspective is unique and her works were immediately viewed as art. She shares her secrets about story and light ! Thank you!

what an exceptionally creative person! i could listen to her talk about photography, lighting, subjects, staging every day for the rest of my life and still learn more about photography. her eye sees so very much and i greatly appreciate her willingness to share her in/sight.

This class helped encourage me to follow my dream of being an independent portrait and music photographer and not taking a corporate product photographer. I just had the best weekend of my career and got to photography over 30 of the best musicians I've heard recenlty. -brianbarnicle.com

Comments

John E.

For me, Annie speaks of what makes a great photograph, and , I think intuitively we ponder, then come to lo life and feel what we are looking for in the image, take the shot, and you become compelled to continue a creative process facilitated by your gut instincts, or intuitive way of expressing yours and the subjects feeling, or mood. I think you are trying to capture a mood generated by good reasoning skills, intuition, and feeling, and lots of it.

John E.

I love to hear Annie speak on the topic she has become so passionate for, photojournalism and portraits; where's the line? For me, taking her photojournalism into a kind of creative artistic venture and fine art as I see her work, demonstrates not professionalism, but profound passion for telling her story, and sort of crosses over into something different. And, for me, this is fine art.

John E.

Throughout the Introduction I kept thinking Portraits. Annie is my favorite portrait photographer as well as (dare I mention another portrait photographer), Joey Lawrence, but in keeping with portraits and bringing them into a fine arts arena has definitely captured my appeal. Annie is superb, wonderful, beautiful, and so very, very highly skilled. I can only hope to become as good as a great as herself. Through story-telling I photograph with my best friend and lovely wife Judith. Here, I captured dear Judith pondering (only for a moment), between sessions. I can only wonder what she may be thinking, but viewing her wedding band and head band along with her silvery-white hair has me pondering on what a beauty she is. Judith is my blessing I pass over to the reading audience for review. She is the most tender-hearted woman I know. Annie, many thanks for sharing your experience through this highly rated Introduction!! John G Evans

A fellow student

While she was talking I could not stop thinking how to thake a picture of her that could reflect a glimpse of the passion she puts in what she does. Great experience.

A fellow student

A really great insight into the feeling of capturing the instant of light to depict humanity.

Andriy R.

Although broad, her definition on what makes a great photograph struck a note. Perhaps its because I'm a novice looking for a shortcuts, but perhaps it's because I've taken photos that mean a great deal to me, yet are far from perfect. This is a photo of an old lady I met in the Everest region. She spent her entire life in the mountains, using her tumpline to carry bushels of firewood up and down the steep slopes of the Himalayas. She was also clever... insisted on me taking the photo, and then asked to tip the model :)

cheyenne L.

I do understand feeling that there is still a picture left untaken sometimes. It may not turn out to be the most popular rather the must satisfying.

Brian C.

I like how she put it when she said, all the practice will prepare you for the time that there is no time to think about the shot. great reason to always be practicing.

Gina M.

Interesting. There were things she said that surprised me like. I never realized she took the last picture of Lennon. Or that what makes a great picture is what "you" think of it. I loves this one because it's my cat daydreaming.

Jorge R.

It doesn't matters the equipment, it matters what's inside you, what you see and the result of that. Thanks Annie.