From Annie Leibovitz's MasterClass

Portrait Photography

Annie discusses portraiture and photojournalism, and what makes portrait photography so compelling for her as a medium. Learn why Annie loves the photo series and why a single image cannot truly "capture" a person.*

Topics include: Photojournalism and Portraits • Capturing History • Photo Essays

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Annie discusses portraiture and photojournalism, and what makes portrait photography so compelling for her as a medium. Learn why Annie loves the photo series and why a single image cannot truly "capture" a person.*

Topics include: Photojournalism and Portraits • Capturing History • Photo Essays

Annie Leibovitz

Teaches Photography

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The Art Of The Photo

Annie Leibovitz was the first woman to be named chief photographer at Rolling Stone and the last person to take a portrait of John Lennon. In her first online photography class, Annie shows us that what makes a picture stunning isn’t the gear or technology—it’s the story. Annie teaches you her philosophy: how to develop concepts, work with subjects, shoot with natural light, and bring images to life in post-production. See the world through her eyes.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

Love, love, love this class. When it comes to a true master, Annie Liebowitz is the one. The class was intimate, her teaching style superb.

I love listening to Annie talk about her approaches and techniques. Though her work is astounding, she makes it all sound very simple and reachable!

It gives a great perspective of a lifetime's work, and what it feels like to be a full-time photographer. The things that bug you, and the ways to work through it.

i really enjoyed annie. her consistent passion, a true love for the craft. she gave me many inspirations to investigate. its hard to put into words the essence of what she does best but she managed to communicate that mystique.

Comments

A fellow student

While she was talking I could not stop thinking how to thake a picture of her that could reflect a glimpse of the passion she puts in what she does. Great experience.

A fellow student

A really great insight into the feeling of capturing the instant of light to depict humanity.

Andriy R.

Although broad, her definition on what makes a great photograph struck a note. Perhaps its because I'm a novice looking for a shortcuts, but perhaps it's because I've taken photos that mean a great deal to me, yet are far from perfect. This is a photo of an old lady I met in the Everest region. She spent her entire life in the mountains, using her tumpline to carry bushels of firewood up and down the steep slopes of the Himalayas. She was also clever... insisted on me taking the photo, and then asked to tip the model :)

cheyenne L.

I do understand feeling that there is still a picture left untaken sometimes. It may not turn out to be the most popular rather the must satisfying.

Brian C.

I like how she put it when she said, all the practice will prepare you for the time that there is no time to think about the shot. great reason to always be practicing.

Gina M.

Interesting. There were things she said that surprised me like. I never realized she took the last picture of Lennon. Or that what makes a great picture is what "you" think of it. I loves this one because it's my cat daydreaming.

Jorge R.

It doesn't matters the equipment, it matters what's inside you, what you see and the result of that. Thanks Annie.

Paul G.

I feel inspired to go out with my camera! She is such a pro - feel lucky to listen to her.

Music C.

So many good takeaways in this lesson. I was encouraged by the concept of a series to tell the story. I find myself taking multiple photos of subjects all of the time. It's just to hard to capture a person, object or scene in just one shot. I also like when she mentioned that she can't remember even shooting the photo of the bike and blood, that it was just instinctual, that's what I am aiming for.

Dasha D.

Seeing how limiting the "series" to even 2 images is so difficult. I shoot mainly editorial photographer and hence the stories are always fashion and concept inspired rather than 1-on-1 portrait. I am very eager to change up my work flow to be more 1 solid portrait rather than a long series as I believe it stands out better through the years. Fashion editorials are rather meaningless if you think about it. Its time to make it more about people than the clothing.