From Annie Leibovitz's MasterClass

Student Sessions

Annie sits down with students from her alma mater, the San Francisco Art Institute, to critique their work and share her own approach to core principles of photography.

Topics include: Photographing Family and Friends • Learning How to See • Being a Director • Storytelling in a Series • Don’t Be Afraid to Go Back • Connecting With the World Through Photography

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Annie sits down with students from her alma mater, the San Francisco Art Institute, to critique their work and share her own approach to core principles of photography.

Topics include: Photographing Family and Friends • Learning How to See • Being a Director • Storytelling in a Series • Don’t Be Afraid to Go Back • Connecting With the World Through Photography

Annie Leibovitz

Teaches Photography

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The Art Of The Photo

Annie Leibovitz was the first woman to be named chief photographer at Rolling Stone and the last person to take a portrait of John Lennon. In her first online photography class, Annie shows us that what makes a picture stunning isn’t the gear or technology—it’s the story. Annie teaches you her philosophy: how to develop concepts, work with subjects, shoot with natural light, and bring images to life in post-production. See the world through her eyes.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

similar roots to mine, but different stems and flowers. there's nothing like differences to show similarities.

Just an amazing class! I majored in Photography and this was a very nice and perfect complement to my education. Thank you.

Annie thought deeply and shared her feelings and process.

Loved the first class! I really identify with not being pigeon holed into "such and such photographer" I love photographing whatever catches my eye!

Comments

J'nee H.

I like that she has included students. In other MasterClasses the instructors don't do this. The reality is work today is in the digital format. This is a total kismet photo that I got on a trip to Burma. No studio, no special lighting- I just loved the subjects.

Graeme R.

Excited about the work of the German/Russian woman (Mika, I think) in taking portraits of Mennonites in Siberia. Beautiful indeed. Is the title of her book available?

Katherine H.

I enjoyed seeing the students' work and hearing them talk about it. The instructor's commentary bestows the benefit not only of her talent, but of her wisdom and experience, and she delivers grace and aplomb. She skillfully draws students out and engages them, choosing questions carefully to develop their thinking about their work.

Ralph F.

Taj Mahal, had to take the lamp shade off a table lamp, only light in the room

Ralph F.

Lightnin’ Hopkins with extremely close stage lighting, profile helped diffuse things I think

Jim C.

When did the 35mm lens become the standard lens for 35mm photography? I have been shooting for a long time and it's always been the 50mm. I mentioned this to a friend who teaches photography and a retired photojournalist for a local paper, and he says it is the 50mm lens. He thought perhaps 35mm was for cropped senor digital, but just looked at lesson again and the one girl is shooting film. I'm fortunate to have a number of photographer friends with who I meet regularly. We don't directly discuss our images though. We see them on our various social media platforms. I've always felt they know way more then me as they have made livings as photographers at various times. One even won a Pulitzer for an image years ago.

Saba

I usually don't like the lessons that involve students in the Masterclasses, but for once I loved hearing and seeing the work of contemporaries. Annie offers precise feedback and advice, and it's everything I love.

Brenda K.

This a photo that I took of my great niece. Thought it captured the moment of how much she loved her horses. She is like 6 years old. Really want to capture moments and tell stories, which was parti this lesson and was great.

PHIL

A photo of Hans, a beloved family friend and welder. His dislike for the camera is clearly outweighed by his project. He passed some years ago...

Laron C.

This is an image i shoot with a very good friend who decided this would be the last time she would be posing inferno to a camera. After going through the last corse and seeing how some of the images of the students meant so much the students, it made me stop and think what some of my images really meant to me.