From Annie Leibovitz's MasterClass

Case Study Part 2: Digital Post-Production

Annie gives you an exclusive look into her digital post-production process, and shares her thoughts about what it means to be a photographer and creative artist.

Topics include: After the Shoot • The Screen vs. a Print • Final Thoughts

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Annie gives you an exclusive look into her digital post-production process, and shares her thoughts about what it means to be a photographer and creative artist.

Topics include: After the Shoot • The Screen vs. a Print • Final Thoughts

Annie Leibovitz

Teaches Photography

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The Art Of The Photo

Annie Leibovitz was the first woman to be named chief photographer at Rolling Stone and the last person to take a portrait of John Lennon. In her first online photography class, Annie shows us that what makes a picture stunning isn’t the gear or technology—it’s the story. Annie teaches you her philosophy: how to develop concepts, work with subjects, shoot with natural light, and bring images to life in post-production. See the world through her eyes.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

I am young, inexperienced, and I have a desire for adventure. This class was inspiring, it introduces you to a world of art. Love the beginning of my story in photography.

The class was inspiring to me to go out and shoot photos in a way I’ve never done before. I can’t wait to get started.

I am very independent and personal in my photographic "eye." It is wonderful to hear Annie's simplicity in regards to the technical side of photography which I pretty much ignore and focus on composition. Maybe there is hope for me :) I am 71 and will be taking off in my 40' bus next fall on a Travel America photography trip.

Definitely a course that will motivate you to push yourself and to drive your passion. You will learn what has driven her journey in the past decades as an artist.

Comments

Steve H.

The lessons were helpful in showing the Alice Liddell photograph as an inspiration, the peach as a clever prop with a woman known for her food-centric passion and then the confluence for the actual shoot. The post-processing digital re-formatting displayed her conceptions about the image but the technician was the unsung master of the final creation.

michael W.

I'm glad to see the post process talk and work but as a teaching lesson it's missing. Joel Grimes does a much better job of this.

michael W.

I think it's sad to see a photographer who doesn't do their own post-processing work. Whether it be the darkroom or digital you are the artist. You should be doing the work. I don't think Picasso directed someone else to do the color in his painting.

Christine

Not sure about this lesson. Part of me is interested to see the process she goes through but when I see it I'm left wishing the end product wasn't quite so contrived.

Mark W.

I feel like as soon as the camera crew left she went back to whacking her Photoshop serf with that pointy stick.

Graeme R.

Very disappointed in both the production and post-production processes. Special peaches, special trees, big crews, and then it's "all in the post." Is it any different than any other advertising photographer (and her/his team) working in New York? And the concept seems obvious and banal. Where's the creativity? Where's the art? Then again, Alice Waters's publicist may have nixed the other ideas.

Yuko H.

I love how she bends the "rules" in order to bring her vision to life. It makes her work so organic and real

Jim C.

I like hearing her thought process. It is a bit like the old dark room days when the photographer would have an expert lab tech that translated what they wanted in the darkroom. Except now she has someone who fulfills the ideas in PhotoShop or whatever program. I have had an internal thought struggle in the past of "If others are doing your PhotoShop or developing, is it yours or part theirs? " It comes down to who has the artistic vision and if those helping to create it are tools, assistants, or collaborators.

Kenton M.

Short lesson.... however, it does show how she edits and thinks every time after a shoot!

Amelia D.

I think keeping her face in the shadow was a brave choice, and part of why she is who she is. She's thinking creatively not just focusing on a set of rules and mindlessly adhering to them.