From David Lynch's MasterClass

On Set: Creating a Happy Family

Treat your team like a happy family and they will go the extra mile for you. Learn how David handles the pressures of the set while protecting a creative space for the cast and crew.

Topics include: Starting the Day • Making the Day • Make Your Sets Living Characters • Catch Ideas Even While the Cameras are Rolling • Getting the Gold

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Treat your team like a happy family and they will go the extra mile for you. Learn how David handles the pressures of the set while protecting a creative space for the cast and crew.

Topics include: Starting the Day • Making the Day • Make Your Sets Living Characters • Catch Ideas Even While the Cameras are Rolling • Getting the Gold

David Lynch

Teaches Creativity and Film

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Connect with your creativity

An avant-garde figure in filmmaking, David Lynch introduced mainstream audiences to art-house films. Now the Oscar-nominated director of Mulholland Drive teaches his cross-disciplinary creative process. Learn how he catches ideas, translates them into a narrative, and moves beyond formulaic storytelling. Embrace the art life in David’s MasterClass and learn to test the boundaries of your own artistic expression in any medium.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

Lynch's Class was a truly amazing experience professionally and personally. Thanks to allow a deeper look in the mind and work process of this art.

I learned a lot about creativity and a new point of view about making things

It's truly insightful, beautiful and wonderful

Very inspirational and one of the best Masterclasses i've seen so far! David Lynch focuses on how to be creative and find your own style rather than just talking about the craft.

Comments

herzog@shoehornproductions.com

always loved david, especially now that he has aged and is sharing wonderful bits of wisdom with us, but i am surprised he is talking to us like we are beginners, i am a veteran and know almost all of the information he is giving us, I am looking for tricks of the trade and insights.....hmmmmmm....anyone listening?

Dimitri E.

He is a genius master, but for those that have to come up with and shoot their own stories now.....well it's a different scene to Eraserhead, but in a way a more exciting one.

Margaret M.

Hey, filmmakers: what does he mean when he talks about the things on the frame, the card and the sound card? I understand that he's talking about the essential material, but can you explain the references? TIA.

Whitney A.

I love you, David Lynch! I’m sitting here on day two of your MasterClass, recovering from surgery with little to do physically, and am instead mentally active, hanging on every word, sound and visual element of the class. I haven’t even finished, yet see how “the idea” and being true to it, is tethered to every section in every lesson. Being able to retain this “big picture” philosophy, can apply to everything in life. You communicate clearly and with interest, your compassion for life and people. I had to stop in the middle of the section to type my thoughts. Thank you for taking time to do a MasterClass; I’ll be rewatching it. You are a “master” of your craft, and a “class” act. ❤️🙏🏻

Donn L.

I’m so inspired by ERASERHEAD because I feel like David Lynch was making this film without much guidance or instruction. It’s creative storytelling and meshed with sound, contrast and blocking (among other things) to be the complete work of art. For me it’s so great to watch that film and be “open to dream” about the lives the characters lived before we found them in our story. About where they are going and what they love and hate and all the things we do… ERASERHEAD is like an exercise in how to make a film when you don’t know how to make a film and in such a film, there are no rules. And so the world they live in can have bent rules as well… There isn’t a formula or a system to adhere to and I love that about the film. It’s inspiring to watch because its a film that states to other filmmakers, “It can be done”.

Charlie W.

This was a fantastic lesson. Hearing about how Bob was a very, in the moment decision and creation is unbelievable, never knew that before. The fact that he was still so open to such major changes and additions whilst being in the middle of a shoot and making it work just speaks to his creativity. With all the time spent in pre-production, developing and writing the story, unheard of for such major changes to happen so spontaneously. All the talk of keeping things less stressful and maintaining a healthy and more positive workspace is a lesson so many should learn, know of several workplaces where the "leadership" just breeds negativity unnecessarily. Treating people well and making them comfortable only improves morale, their wellbeing and ultimately, their creativity and commitment to the work.

Jerry R.

Good discussion about keeping things on the set less stressful. I notice that some bosses complain in front of their employees... it probably doesn't help their morale. Liked what he said about sets being living characters, and we just get it little by little. A lot of stories try to tell everything at once, too much exposition.

Michele H.

His willingness to be open to new inspirations with Frank Silva and take Twin Peaks in new directions speaks to his devotion to creativity. If he didn't allow himself to see the set from new directions and appreciate 'happy accidents' I wouldn't have had as much fun with the series as I did.

Danny D.

"...Something exist already, but we just get it little by little." Makes me think of, "The Joker" existing as an entity. Lol.

Javier D.

Find very important the suggestions of extending coverage of a scene with macros, set details, more than the plan.