From Margaret Atwood's MasterClass

Story and Plot

Learn what makes a strong plot. Margaret advises you to study myths, fairy tales, and other historical works of literature so that you can use them as building blocks for your stories.

Topics include: Stories Are Patterns Interrupted • What Makes a Strong Plot • Draw From the Stories That Have Come Before • Know the Essential Stories in Order to Subvert Them

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Learn what makes a strong plot. Margaret advises you to study myths, fairy tales, and other historical works of literature so that you can use them as building blocks for your stories.

Topics include: Stories Are Patterns Interrupted • What Makes a Strong Plot • Draw From the Stories That Have Come Before • Know the Essential Stories in Order to Subvert Them

Margaret Atwood

Teaches Creative Writing

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Preview

Once upon a time when my child and her friends were five, they said we're going to put on a play. And we're selling tickets. They're $0.25 each. Of course, we had to buy some. We sat down to watch the play. The play was about breakfast. And it consisted of would you like some orange juice. Yes, thank you. Good. Here is your orange juice. I am having cereal. Would you like some cereal? Yes. Would you like some milk for your cereal. Yes, I will have milk on my cereal. This went on for a while. And finally, we said is anything else going to happen. And they said no. And we said, in that case, we're leaving, and we'll come back when something else is going to happen. The story needs to have events, and it needs to have characters. And any story, even the most elementary stories, which are things like "Aesop's Fables" or jokes. They have characters, and they have events. A story needs a break in a pattern to get it going. And breaking the pattern can be, one day, Mabis, who was an avid gardener, went out to her rose patch and found a severed hand. If everything is perfect all the time, there isn't a story. Life is just wonderful everyday. And so it doesn't become a story until somebody kidnaps Rover the dog. So an event of some kind interrupts the pattern. And with that interruption, the story is kicked off. [MUSIC PLAYING] A good plot has to have something happening in it that is of interest to the reader, and we hope to the characters. Or maybe I'll put that the other way around. That is of interest to the characters, and we hope to the reader. Something has to happen. And that something can be any number of somethings. So John and Mary are living happily in their split-level with two cars. And then, one day, a strange green light is seen in the sky, and a canister descends to earth right behind their house. And out of it comes a tentacled monster. So that's one kind of story. Threat from without. John and Mary are living in their split-level bungalow, but then Mary discovers that John is cheating on her. That's another kind of story-- threat from within. Combine those. John and Mary are living in their split-level bungalow. Then, John discovers that Mary is mysteriously absent during parts of the night and has developed an alarming tendency to sleep in the bath tub with all the curtains drawn. What has happened? What are those strange white fangs that have appeared? Could it be that Mary is a vampire. Yes! What is John going to do? And what about the children? Have they inherited this tendency or not? That's another kind of story. So, yes, all of these are events. They're all blood pressure increasing, suspense building, plot devices to make us want to know what is going to happen next. [MUSIC PLAYING] The building blocks of story in Western civilization is going to be somewhat different in other cultures, but they all have their own set of building blocks. That's the toolkit, if you like, the toolkit of stories. Think o...

The art of powerful storytelling

Called the “Prophet of Dystopia,” Margaret Atwood is one of the most influential literary voices of our generation. In her first-ever online writing class, the author of The Handmaid’s Tale teaches how she crafts compelling stories, from historical to speculative fiction, that remain timeless and relevant. Explore Margaret’s creative process for developing ideas into novels with strong structures and nuanced characters.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

I think her phrase of 'conjuring up' impressed me the most. I have loved to write all of my life and never heard that phrase applied before, made me rethink everything I put on paper now. Conjuring up just appeals to me, makes my imagination take on even bigger wings and high higher. Thank you Margaret.

Loved this class and the way Margaret Atwood presented it!

Margaret Atwood is absolutely lovely, made me laugh with her great humor sense and overall I enjoyed spending time with her class.

The Margaret Atwood Master Class has been inspiring. She doesn't do the work for me, but helps me to get down to work with her helpful guidance.

Comments

Debbie J.

I love her suggestion for "building blocks" literature. World mythology is so rich with inspiration for stories and, of course, the Bible has an incredible amount of dramatic stories and symbolisms.

Keymasha

This lesson was such a great piece of guidance for someone who goes back and forth with certain aspects of the writing process. It was freeing to my creative methods that I felt looked so different than what others flow in. I got a lot out of her prompting us to face our fears by identifying them and then putting a plan in place to overcome it. It gave me a fresh wind to go back in to the lab and write daily.

Wendy R.

Really helpful to identify your fear. With me, though, most of the time the problem is that it doesn't rise to MY standards.

Jenny H.

I was struck by the discussion of not understanding the references. I tell my students this all the time! If you want to get the "joke" or the twist, you have to know the original.

SalHorn B.

I love the idea of combining threat from without and within, that is compelling to me. I also agree that to understand the building blocks is essential (like the joke about fundamentalists lol). Homework for me is to re-read myths and find some more Indigenous stories. I should probably also go over some Bible stories as I have largely dismissed that source.

David B.

John and Mary examples especially the vampire part sound like Supernatural!

Sam

I really liked the example used about the play to explain a break in pattern. I'm always fearful that the pieces I write aren't interesting, but this has helped me understand how I can change that

A fellow student

That's great advice--expanding your frame of reference because it'll give you more depth in thinking about stories. I'm working on a thriller novel, so I am always trying to stay up-to-date on what's currently being written in the genre, as well as reading up on the classics to see what has been done before, what's predictable, and how to switch it up.

Gareth S.

I loved this chapter and the assignment. I particularly liked the fact that an object can start a work.

Lois C.

I really liked the point that Margaret Atwood made to begin with, that a story is an interruption of a pattern.