To submit requests for assistance, or provide feedback regarding accessibility, please contact support@masterclass.com.

Lifestyle

How to Hang a Tapestry: 6 Ways to Hang a Tapestry

Written by MasterClass

Last updated: Sep 16, 2020 • 3 min read

Wall tapestries are a great way to bring a bare wall to life with textile art—whether you’re in a dorm room or your own home. Tapestries come in many different shapes and sizes, from heavy antique tapestries to airy modern ones, and once you’ve found the perfect tapestry, the next step is to mount it securely to your wall.

Save

Share


Bobbi Brown Teaches Makeup and BeautyBobbi Brown Teaches Makeup and Beauty

Bobbi Brown teaches you the tips, tricks, and techniques for applying simple, natural makeup that makes you feel beautiful in your own skin.

Learn More

6 Ways to Hang a Tapestry

There are several different methods for mounting a tapestry:

  1. Use a hammer and nails. The simplest way to hang a wall tapestry is by using a hammer and nails. Simply nail in one corner, and then nail in the second according to how much drape you want in the fabric—space the nails further apart for a more taut look, and closer together for a drapey look. If your tapestry is especially thin and light, you can substitute the nails for an even lighter solution, like thumbtacks or push pins.
  2. Use wall adhesive. If you don’t want to put holes in your walls or tapestry fabric, using a wall adhesive is a great option. There are many wall adhesives available, including velcro strips, sticky strips, or adhesive clips—simply choose the one you like the look of best, stick them to your wall, and then attach the tapestry. It’s important to note that wall adhesives work best for lighter tapestries—if you have a large tapestry that’s thick or rug-like, you may have to go with a more heavy-duty hanging option.
  3. Hang from a rod. The most traditional way to hang a tapestry is on a tapestry rod mounted to your wall. Many tapestries already have a “rod pocket” on their backside, or a tube of fabric designed to slip onto a curtain rod. If your tapestry has a rod pocket, you’re in luck; simply mount a curtain rod according to the rod’s directions, then slide your tapestry onto it. If your tapestry doesn’t have a rod pocket, you can sew your own pocket using a sewing machine and some old fabric. Simply cut a strip of old fabric the width of your tapestry and a few inches long, and sew it along the long seams to the top back of the tapestry. The curtain rod approach is an excellent method for any tapestry, whether it’s light and thin, or thick and heavy.
  4. Hang the tapestry with thread. If you’re willing to make a series of small holes in your tapestry, you can hang your tapestry with thread, using a cute DIY method that includes scissors, twine, and nails. To begin, measure an inch or so down from the top hem of your tapestry and mark several points at even intervals where you can make a small incision. Then, use scissors to cut a small hole in the fabric at each point. Next, thread your rope or length of twine through each hole, alternatively going over and under the tapestry, until the twine runs the length of your tapestry. After your twine is securely woven into your tapestry, nail the ends of it to the wall.
  5. Stretch the fabric over a frame. A less-common tapestry hanging method that can look especially striking is stretching the fabric over a plywood board or wood frame. The benefit of this method is that you can then mount the frame to the wall (like a painting), or simply rest it on a dresser or the ground and lean it up against the wall. To stretch your tapestry, spread it over a wooden board until it’s centered to your preference, then pull an edge taut on the back and use a staple gun to attach it. Do this with all four edges, being sure to pull the edges taut to make sure the fabric looks evenly stretched on the front.
  6. Frame the tapestry. If you have a smaller tapestry or one that is delicate (whether it’s antique or a treasured item), consider framing it under glass with a picture frame. If your tapestry has dimensions standard for works of art, you can buy a premade frame; if your tapestry has more unique dimensions, you may need to buy a custom frame from a frame shop. While this option can be more expensive, it can help make your tapestry look especially striking while preserving it for future generations.

Learn More

Learn interior design from award-winning designer Kelly Wearstler. Make any space feel larger, cultivate your own distinct style, and create spaces that tell a story with the MasterClass All-Access Pass.

Bobbi Brown Teaches Makeup and Beauty
Kelly Wearstler Teaches Interior Design
Brandon McMillan Teaches Dog Training
Ron Finley Teaches Gardening

Save

Share