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Business

9 Strategies for Defining Your Company’s Culture

Written by MasterClass

Last updated: Oct 2, 2020 • 2 min read

Company culture matters and has implications for your bottom line. A great company culture can create a work environment that encourages team building and employee engagement and that also helps you retain top talent, meaning you’ll be better set up for business success in the long run.

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Sara Blakely Teaches Self-Made EntrepreneurshipSara Blakely Teaches Self-Made Entrepreneurship

Spanx founder Sara Blakely teaches you bootstrapping tactics and her approach to inventing, selling, and marketing products that consumers love.

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What Is Company Culture?

Company culture (or organizational culture) is the way a company's values and mission statement manifest in the day-to-day of the workplace—it is, essentially, your company's personality.

Companies with a positive culture will likely have happy employees and better overall longevity. Spanx is a company known for cultivating strong culture based on fun and creativity and a place where the primacy of workplace culture and the importance of positive company values are emphasized. “Culture eats strategy for breakfast” is one of Spanx founder Sara Blakely’s favorite quotes. As an entrepreneur, Sarah was able to build her business's culture and shared values from the ground up—and she's created a thriving brand as a result.

9 Strategies for Defining Your Company’s Culture

As the head of your business, you get to set the core values of you workplace and lay the foundation for a strong work culture. Here are some key elements you’ll need to think about as you do it:

  1. Build trust: Trust your employees and they’ll trust you.
  2. Empower your workers: Don’t micromanage—empower your team members to make their own decisions.
  3. Set clear goals: People need to know what they’re aiming for, so they feel like there’s an ultimate point to what they’re doing every day at work.
  4. Emphasize purpose: Give your employees a reason to be at work beyond making money.
  5. Provide fair compensation: Show your employees that you value their time.
  6. Highlight shared wins: When the company has a success, your whole team has it, too. Consider treating your employees to some spoils when you hit a home run.
  7. Show appreciation: Thank your employees when you know they’re working hard—this extends to all your employees, not just your top performers.
  8. Invest in well-being: Take an interest in your employees—not just as employees but as people. Include perks like a wellness stipend to ensure they’re able to live rounded lives.
  9. Allow freedom to make mistakes: Don’t punish your team for its failures. If you create a corporate culture in which the people at your company get scared of making mistakes, they won’t make bold moves
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Want to Learn More About Business?

Sara Blakely had no fashion, retail, or business leadership experience when she invented Spanx in the late 1990s. All she had was $5,000 and an idea. Which means you can start your own billion-dollar business, too. Learn more about finding your purpose, making prototypes, building awareness, and selling your product in Sara Blakely’s MasterClass.

Get the MasterClass Annual Membership for exclusive access to video lessons taught by business luminaries, including Sara Blakely, Bob Iger, Howard Schultz, Anna Wintour, and more.

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