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A-line, skater, tulip, mermaid—there are so many types of skirts that shopping can become overwhelming. When it comes to skirt styles, different shapes can emphasize or deemphasize different parts of your body. Learning more about common skirt silhouettes will help you choose skirts that flatter your body and complement your personal style.

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24 Types of Skirts

Whether you want to start sewing your own clothes or experiment with different kinds of skirts for your body type, this guide will help you find the right skirt for your body shape:

  1. A-line skirt: Named after the capital letter A, an A-line skirt fits at the waist with a slight flare as it travels to the hem. This silhouette is a broad category featuring a variety of styles that have a waist-narrowing effect.
  2. Asymmetrical skirt: An asymmetrical skirt comes in a variety of shapes. This silhouette features a hemline that is higher on one side than the other, usually in length. For instance, the right side of the skirt will be shorter than the left.
  3. Bell skirt: A bell skirt includes extra fabric or structure at the waistline of the garment to create a more voluptuous, princess-like shape, similar to a bell. This silhouette adds more volume to your hips and can have a narrowing effect on your waist. A bell skirt is especially popular for formal events, like weddings.
  4. Bubble skirt: A bubble skirt fits in the waist, flares out near the hips, and becomes fitted again at the hemline to form a bubble shape, making your hips look wider and fuller.
  5. Bustle skirt: Bustle skirts are a modern take on the structural undergarments that women from the Victorian era wore under their dresses, with several gathers and tucks intended to create a crinkled, voluminous shape.
  6. Broomstick skirt: A broomstick skirt resembles a traditional broom, with a narrow waist and flared shape. Broomstick skirts are designed for casual wear and moveability, featuring pleats, an elastic waistband, and lightweight, breathable fabrics. With high-coverage, this silhouette deemphasizes your curves.
  7. Circle skirt: A circle skirt is a significantly flared version of an A-line skirt, in which the hem, when flattened, forms a perfect circle around the waist. This silhouette has a narrowing effect on your waistline.
  8. High-low skirt: A high-low skirt features different hem lengths in the front and back: a shorter hem in the front, and a longer hem in the back.
  9. Layered skirt: A layered skirt is made by stitching several different fabric layers together so that each layer peeks out from under the previous to form a voluminous shape.
  10. Maxi skirt: A maxi skirt is any skirt that reaches floor-length (or close to it) on the wearer. Ankle-length skirts are a type of maxi skirt.
  11. Mermaid skirt: A mermaid skirt is slim-fitting in the waist and hips, flaring out just above the hem, similar to a fishtail’s shape. This silhouette emphasizes your hips. Mermaid skirts are especially fit for elegant looks, most often seen in semi-formal wear or cocktail wear.
  12. Midi skirt: A midi skirt is a medium-length skirt, ending anywhere from just below the knees to just above the ankles. Calf-length skirts are a type of midi skirt.
  13. Miniskirt: A miniskirt is a short skirt, ending above the knees. The short length of miniskirts makes them especially popular for party wear.
  14. Peasant skirt: Inspired by the garments of historical working-class women, a peasant skirt is a long skirt made with pleats and layers to form a patchwork-like structure. This high-waisted skirt deemphasizes your curves.
  15. Pencil skirt: A pencil skirt is form-fitting from waist to hips to hem, usually featuring a slit to allow for more ease of movement. As fitted skirts, pencil skirts will draw attention to the lower part of the body, from waist to hips to knees. Also known as the tube skirt, this silhouette is especially prominent in office wear.
  16. Pleated skirt: Also known as an accordion skirt, a pleated skirt features narrow pleats around the entire skirt to increase movability and comfort. With high coverage, a pleated skirt deemphasizes your curves.
  17. Poodle skirt: A classic style from the 1950s, traditional poodle skirts are simple knee-length felt A-line skirts featuring an appliqué—usually of a poodle. For a more modern look, poodle skirts can come from any fabric with any appliqué. This silhouette has a narrowing effect on the waist and draws attention away from wide hips.
  18. Sarong skirt: Inspired by the traditional skirts of Southeast Asian, a sarong skirt is a simple wrap-around skirt that ties around the wearer on one side. This silhouette is especially popular for pool cover-ups on hot summer days.
  19. Skater skirt: A skater skirt is a flared version of an A-line skirt that is usually short, ending above the knees. This silhouette has a narrowing effect on your waist.
  20. Straight skirt: A straight skirt has a rectangle shape with similar measurements from waist to hips to hem, moving in a straight line down the wearer’s body. This silhouette doesn’t emphasize the lower body, but is an excellent complement to broad shoulders.
  21. Tiered skirt: A tiered skirt features different fabric circles stitched together as you move down the hem, often flaring out toward the bottom, making your waist look narrow and deemphasizing your hips. Tiered skirts come in various lengths, from knee-length to floor-length.
  22. Tulip skirt: A tulip skirt has hems tucked into the skirt’s body, creating an irregular hemline that resembles an upside-down tulip flower and drawing attention to your hemline.
  23. Tutu skirt: A tutu skirt is a tulle skirt with an elastic waistband and many flaring layers of tulle, taking its inspiration from traditional ballet costumes. This silhouette narrows your waist and deemphasizes your hips.
  24. Wrap skirt: A wrap skirt wraps around the wearer’s body and is typically secured with a tie strap, drawing attention to your waist.

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