From Gordon Ramsay's MasterClass

Mastering Ingredients: Vegetables & Herbs

Do ugly vegetables taste better? Which are the most versatile herbs? Gordon shows you how to select great produce to create phenomenal dishes.

Topics include: Vegetables • Herbs

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Do ugly vegetables taste better? Which are the most versatile herbs? Gordon shows you how to select great produce to create phenomenal dishes.

Topics include: Vegetables • Herbs

Gordon Ramsay

Teaches Cooking I

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Transform your cooking

This is Gordon Ramsay like you've never experienced. The seven-star Michelin chef takes you into his home kitchen to learn everything from kitchen setup and buying the freshest ingredients to constructing unforgettable dishes. In this MasterClass, you're not just learning recipes, you're learning how to take your cooking to the next level.

Reviews

4.7
Students give MasterClass an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars.

Love the pace, and the ability to watch and rewatch

For learn this class is so recommend for everyone . Not only teach you how to cook but the story to become a Master , about finding your passion and many more . But the ingridient are so hard to find in Medan , Indonesia

Inspiring to see such a great chef teach us simple yet very fundamental things.

I wish I could have the opportunity to cook with Gordon Ramsey in person, but I'll have to settle for this.

Comments

Analisa

I can’t download the attachment... says “session expired” even after I refresh.

Isobel M.

This is my rosemary bush...except it belongs to my neighbour! I’m never, ever going to run out!!

Terry F.

Chef Ramsey - all I can say is thank you. I am an experienced cook on a home cook basis with lots of classes behind me. I can't stop learning, I crave it. I am never happy thinking I know something. For this reason alone at 73 I just feel so lucky to have decided to investigate Masterclass and your offerings. I am a fan of the "f" word myself so that expressing itself made me feel at home. The reverence for the planets offerings once in your hands and your mindset have elevated me to a new experience. It is my great honor to be a student of your class, leaving behind what I thought I knew, taking forward what I do know and then taking your hand and mind and following you into your kitchen. The herbs and vegetable video already shows me new insights, not only on what to do, but how to respect and approach where it waits in my kitchen looking for me to take it from its pot, not from a plastic bag and then thanking me by the explosion it will offer to my dish. What a gift. I can't wait to view all that is waiting. I NOW UNDERSTAND WHY YOU SAID IN THE INTRO WATCH CAREFULLY AND LISTEN CAREFULLY.....oh yes, I will.

Victoria S.

I love his passion, even after decades of cooking he still picks up an herb and lights up.

Rebecca M.

Thank you, Steph Tod, for the idea of looking for seasonal lists for produce for the place(s) where we live. I've just located several for my two home states of Arizona and New Mexico, such as this one. http://fillyourplate.org/produce-season.html

A fellow student

Chef’s descriptions of the food opens limitless possibilities. I appreciate how he can pick up Fennel and see a dish.

A fellow student

I am open to any suggestions for substitutes.. I have food sensitivities, to Mushrooms, Thyme and Beets.... : (

Reem T.

Given the fact that I love houmous, I decided to try the Roasted Squash Houmous. I do not use butternut squash often in my meals, so I sought this as an opportunity to start now. I followed the recipe to the mg. After trying it, however, I ended up adding the juice of 2 lemons instead of only half. I drizzled olive oil when I served it, but I realized that the olive oil adds to the taste as well as shine.

Steph T.

Here's a link to a seasonality table for any UK-based students - https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/seasonal-calendar/all It includes fruit and veg, as well as meat and fish

Reem T.

I have learned that there are many types of Thyme. they come in different bush size, leaf size and shape, and even aroma. when it comes to cooking, do we treat them the same or as different kinds of herbs?