Culinary Arts

Method: Rolling Pasta Dough

Gordon Ramsay

Lesson time 15:53 min

Gordon shows you how to roll out delicate, paper thin pasta that's perfect for ravioli, tortellini, fettuccine, and a variety of other noodles.

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Comments

Lisa

Great lesson! I tried to make butternut squash ravioli and became frustrated after getting 12 made. Made some spaghetti with raw tomato sauce at the end. Will keep practicing though.

A fellow student

The 2 cups of flour in the recipe should be 2 cups plus extra for kneading and roling etc So you need almost three cups in total. And then the egg's. The egg's are in many sizes. From our backyard chickens we used 4 whole egg's and 2 yolks, a total of 280 grams on 254 grams of typo '00'. Thomas Keller his masterclass uses 500 grams typo '00' and 250 grams of egg yolks. Both methods will work but i think the weight of the egg's and the extra typo "00' is good to mentioning in the recipe book. Greetings from the Netherlands, Koksland.nl

Renee B.

There is no first page of lesson pdf? I see no notes on settings on machine? Gordon's instructions when to change settings were confusing.

A fellow student

My first machine was thus (hideous In hindsight) contraption that mixed the dough and the forced the little pellets of dough through a die . I invested in a manual crank machine and the difference was beyond night and day. I bought the pasta machine attachments for my kitchen aid mixer.

Stephen D.

This pasta is bloody excellent. Got it ridiculously thin. Had a great taste and is definitely a winner. Go for it!

Stephen D.

That is incredible. Very funny too. I felt absolutely exhausted watching this. Great lesson though. I have one of those machines and will be working on this soon. Hope my kitchen is long enough. :-)

A fellow student

Amazing. Would love to see how gluten free pasta is able to be made. I am celiac and wonder if it’s a similar process

Sharon

Okay, I get why you don't wash your pasta machine; all those cranks and nooks and crannies, you'd never get all the flour out properly and then it'd get really gross really quick. But then, you do have to clean it off somehow, right? So what do you do, like a can of compressed air or something to blow all the flour away?

James E.

I learned a bit about pasta making in Italy from chefs...and I had already been making it for years. This lesson and the last lesson reinforced so much! My family actually laughed at me for wanting to make homemade noodles. Then they tasted. Formed and dried pasta has its place but only a 'madman' would spend the money to have a true bronze die machine at home to produce the wonderful variety of shapes. These lessons are a splendid way to get started...and, as Gordon Ramsay suggests, to understand Italian nonnas.

Ken R.

I don't have an assistant, can I cut the strand of dough in half at some point? (Say at about mark 7 or 8). Should I use half of the dough (ball) instead? Can I freeze the unused portion of dough?